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Health is at risk for those who live within five kilometers of a landfill site

According to research published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology, health is at risk for those who live within five kilometres of a landfill site.

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Grill with Caution: Wire Bristles from Barbecue Brushes Can Cause Serious Injuries

While many people view Memorial Day weekend as the unofficial start of the summer grilling season, they may not be aware of the dangers of eating food cooked on grills cleaned with wire-bristle brushes. A new study conducted at the University of Missouri School of Medicine identified more than 1,600 injuries from wire-bristle grill brushes reported in emergency rooms since 2002. Loose bristles can fall off the brush during cleaning and end up in the grilled food, which, if consumed, can lead to injuries in the mouth, throat and tonsils. Researchers advise individuals to inspect their food carefully after grilling or consider alternative grill-cleaning methods.

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EWG Releases 2016 Guide to Sunscreens

Almost three-fourths of the 750 sunscreens evaluated for EWG’s annual Guide to Sunscreens, released today, offer inferior protection or contain worrisome ingredients like oxybenzone, a hormone disruptor, or retinyl palmitate, which may harm skin.

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Top 10 New Species for 2016

A hominin in the same genus as humans and an ape nicknamed "Laia" that might provide clues to the origin of humans are among the discoveries identified by ESF as the Top 10 New Species for 2016.

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What happens when you swallow gum? (video)

It's a legendary piece of playground lore: If you swallow a piece of gum, it stays stuck in your stomach forever. So was your elementary-school buddy right?

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How Processed Foods Wreak Havoc on Your Health

It’s safe to say that most American consumers probably can’t recall the last time they ate a meal prepared entirely from wholesome, farm-to-table ingredients, without any canned or prepackaged products. That’s because most Americans today consume mostly processed foods—foods produced with pesticides, GMOs and synthetic chemicals, routinely laced with too much sugar, salt and unhealthy fats.

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Watching whisky dry for science (video)

Have you ever watched paint dry? How about whisky? It turns out whisky could hold some chemical clues to making better paints. Princeton researcher Howard Stone and photographer Ernie Button wanted to figure out whisky's unique drying properties.

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Wilderness Medical Society issues official guidelines for prevention and treatment of drowning

Drowning is a global threat to human health. Each year, more than 372,000 people die as a result of drowning, with many of those deaths being preventable by simple water safety measures. In order to arm professionals with the most up-to-date clinical protocols, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) has issued a new set of practice guidelines for both the treatment and prevention of drowning, published in the society's official journal, Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.

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No evidence that homeopathic remedies work (video)

Homeopathic remedies are marketed as effective alternatives to traditional medicine. But do they work? To answer this question, Reactions looks at the history of homeopathy, its principles and the scientific studies of various treatments.

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Ahead of Mother’s Day, New Music Video from Elena & Los Fulanos Highlights the Struggle of Families Separated by Broken Immigration System

As families around the country prepare to celebrate Mother’s Day this weekend, a new music video from the bilingual folk-rock group Elena & Los Fulanos reminds us that many immigrant mothers will be spending this holiday apart from their loved ones. The video for the group’s song “Amor Migrante,” features Maryland resident and CASA de Maryland member Rosario Reyes, an undocumented mother who left El Salvador 12 years ago and hasn’t been able to see her son since. The video was produced by Elena Lacayo and directed by filmmaker Ellie Walton, with support from America’s Voice Education Fund, the National Council of La Raza, the National Immigration Law Center, and We Belong Together.

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How to make cut flowers last longer (video)

After April showers, we get May flowers — just in time for Mother's Day. Sadly, after a few days, that wonderful bouquet may start wilting. Thankfully, Reactions has picked out the best science-backed tips to maximize the freshness of your cut flowers.

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Has the library outlived its usefulness in the age of Internet? You'd be surprised

U.S. institutions of higher education and U.S. local governments are under extraordinary pressure to cut costs and eliminate from institutional or governmental ledgers any expenses whose absence would cause little or no pain.

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Why Will Prince's Autopsy (and Others) Take Weeks to Complete?

Prince’s autopsy was conducted by A. Quinn Strobl, MD, FCAP, a member of the College of American Pathologists. The results are expected to take at least two weeks, perhaps as many as six full weeks. This tragedy has people asking again “Why do toxicology results take so long?”

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Has Virginity Lost Its Virtue? Kinsey Study Finds Adults Who Wait to Have Sex Are Stigmatized

When it comes to sex, the message historically has been it is better to wait. But how long is too long to wait to have sex?

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You really can die of a broken heart – here’s the science

When you think of a broken heart, you probably picture something out of a romantic movie or a cartoon heart, cracked like a fragile piece of china. Indeed, so-called “broken heart syndrome” has a certified place in popular culture, and has been eloquently used in films such as The Notebook. But while we certainly feel “heartbreak” during periods of emotional upheaval, can you actually die of a broken heart?

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Better coffee through chemistry (video)

It's one of the most popular beverages in the world, and many of us rely on it to stay awake every day. But not every cup of coffee is created equal. From the bean to the brew, science can help you get the perfect cup.

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"Why do wasps attack?" and other chemistry questions answered (video)

Why do wasps become more aggressive after you kill one of the hive members? The answer is the same reason why you should be wary of bees that smell like bananas. Here's another question: Why does some metal rust? This week, Reactions answers viewers' chemistry questions like these with some short and sweet chemistry.

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No joke: Blondes aren't dumb, science says; new national study refutes damaging stereotype

The "dumb blonde" stereotype is simply wrong, according to a new national study of young baby boomers.

The study of 10,878 Americans found that white women who said their natural hair color was blonde had an average IQ score within 3 points of brunettes and those with red or black hair.

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UN appoints Red from the 'Angry Birds' as Honorary Ambassador for International Day of Happiness

The United Nations today appointed Red, the leader of the “Angry Birds” mobile game characters, as an envoy to inspire climate action toward a sustainable and happier future for all.

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“Alice, the Zeta Cat and Climate Change”: A fairytale about the truth

On a school field trip to Potsdam’s Telegraph Hill, Alice runs after a white rabbit – and falls into a hole, sliding down the ventilation shaft of a climate research institute’s supercomputer. From here on follows a journey through the virtual world of computer models, from tropical rainforests to the ice of Antarctica. This is the rather unusual beginning of a new publication from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), in very free adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s philosophical children’s book classic “Alice in Wonderland”. More than 50 scientists provided their expertise for this work by Margret Boysen, which is being presented at this year's Leipzig Book Fair and is now available in book shops.

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Weather Fluctuations Create Outdoor Recreation Opportunities and Hazards

Recent warmer weather, coupled with heavy rain and snow, has created a recreation paradise for visitors to California’s outdoors. While this is a great time to enjoy our state’s natural beauty, it is imperative to take proper precautions and be aware of potential dangers. Below you will find some basic safety tips from California State Parks to help ensure a safe outdoor adventure:


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We Know Nature Makes Us Happier. Now Science Says It Makes Us Kinder Too

But, even though I’ve always believed that hiking in nature had many psychological benefits, I’ve never had much science to back me up … until now, that is. Scientists are beginning to find evidence that being in nature has a profound impact on our brains and our behavior, helping us to reduce anxiety, brooding, and stress, and to increase our attention capacity, creativity, and ability to connect with other people.

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Planned Parenthood Encourages Women to Get Regular Checkups During Endometriosis Awareness Month

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month, and Planned Parenthood Federation of America encourages all women to prioritize their health by scheduling regular checkups. Endometriosis is a common health problem that affects more than five million women in the U.S, causing chronic pain and in some cases infertility. While there is no cure for endometriosis, for some women and teens the condition can be managed with hormonal birth control.

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Why does stepping on a LEGO® hurt so much? (video)

The sensation may be all too familiar – the intense, sharp pain in your foot caused by an unassuming LEGO® brick. Why does this tiny chunk of plastic cause so much pain? To answer this question, Reactions examines why we feel pain in the first place, as well as the material chemistry of LEGO® bricks.

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SPLC Klan cases to be featured in Investigation Discovery series

A new, three-part series on the Investigation Discovery network – “Hate in America” – will take an in-depth look at the SPLC’s fight against violent extremists.

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Researchers Identify Drug That Could Treat Melanoma

Less than a year after mapping the genetic landscape of melanoma, a researcher from the University of California, Merced, has identified a drug that could be effective in battling the deadly skin cancer.

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Consumer Coalition Calls for In-N-Out Burger to Reduce Routine Antibiotics Use in Beef

Public interest, environmental, food safety and consumer groups representing millions of consumers today announced a campaign calling on In-N-Out Burger, California's iconic hamburger restaurant chain, to stop selling beef produced with the routine use of antibiotics. These groups, including CALPIRG Education Fund, Friends of the Earth, Center for Food Safety, Consumers Union, along with author and activist Vani Hari, delivered a letter to the company’s corporate headquarters signed by more than 50 groups urging that the company commit to a strong antibiotics policy. CALPIRG Education Fund staff and volunteers also held public outreach efforts at In-N-Out restaurants and other locations to motivate the company to do its part to help protect the public from antibiotic resistance.

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Mastering the Art of Ignoring Makes People More Efficient

People searching for something can find it faster if they know what to look for. But new research suggests knowing what not to look for can be just as helpful.

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Watch the chemistry of a burning match in ultra-slow motion (video)

To fire up the grill or the gas stove, we often reach for a match. It turns out there's a lot of chemistry going on to make those little wooden wonders work. The best way to find out about the chemistry of burning matches is to watch it in ultra-slow motion.

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CDC encourages following guidance to prevent sexual transmission of Zika virus

CDC has committed to sharing the latest information on Zika virus as it becomes available. On February 5, 2016, CDC published interim recommendations for protecting people against sexual transmission of Zika virus. This guidance was issued after lab confirmation of the first case of Zika virus infection in a non-traveler in the continental United States, which was linked to sexual contact with an infected partner.

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