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Life
 

Zika, Mosquitoes and How to Not Get Bitten (video)

Diseases from mosquito bites kill hundreds of thousands of people every year worldwide. Now another mosquito-borne illness is making headlines: the once-rare Zika virus.

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Kids! Take Part in the 2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest

The 2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest is open for submissions. The competition, an integral part of the 11th annual national Endangered Species Day celebration, provides school children in grades K through 12 an opportunity to learn about threatened and endangered wildlife while expressing their knowledge and support for conservation efforts through their artistic and creative talents.

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(Trailer) GAYCATION with Ellen Page and Ian Daniel

Ellen Page and her best friend, Ian Daniel, set off on a personal journey to explore LGBTQ cultures around the world. From Japan to Brazil, Jamaica and here in America, Ellen and Ian discover the multiplicity of LGBTQ experiences, meeting amazing people and hearing their deeply moving stories of struggle and triumph.

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California Photographer Named Winner Wildlife Photo Contest

Berkeley resident Jennifer Joynt's image of an American pika in Yosemite National Park earned the 2015 grand prize in the California Wildlife Photo of the Year contest. The image of the furry, diminutive critter was chosen as the winner of the yearlong contest presented by Outdoor California magazine and California Watchable Wildlife Inc., and sponsored by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy and the State Coastal Conservancy.

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Cats domesticated in China earlier than 3000 BC

Were domestic cats brought to China over 5 000 years ago? Or were small cats domesticated in China at that time? There was no way of deciding between these two hypotheses until a team from the 'Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnements' laboratory (CNRS/MNHN), in collaboration with colleagues from the UK and China1, succeeded in determining the species corresponding to cat remains found in agricultural settlements in China, dating from around 3500 BC. All the bones belong to the leopard cat, a distant relation of the western wildcat, from which all modern domestic cats are descended. The scientists have thus provided evidence that cats began to be domesticated in China earlier than 3 000 BC. This scenario is comparable to that which took place in the Near East and Egypt, where a relationship between humans and cats developed following the birth of agriculture. Their findings2 are published on 22 January 2016 in the journal PLOS ONE.

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The best way to help homeless youth is hardly ever used

Teens without homes, many of whom have suffered at the hands of those entrusted with providing them care and kindness, often refuse to seek warmth and nourishment at shelters.

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Shielding a few students from stereotypes benefits everyone's grades, Stanford research shows

Sharing a classroom with students who are protected from negative stereotypes about their group can boost all students' grades, new Stanford research shows.

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Poll: Majority Of Americans Support Legalizing Marijuana

A majority of Americans, including two-thirds of Democrats, believe that marijuana should be legal, according to national survey data compiled by YouGov.com.


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Uneven Steven

The Great Recession, it seemed, didn’t play favorites; nearly everyone suffered. A new paper co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher, however, reveals that female entrepreneurs were much more likely than men to suffer discrimination in getting financing.

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Why is chocolate lethal to dogs and cats? (VIDEO)

Dark, milk, semi-sweet or white, chocolate is a favorite treat for many –-many humans that is. As much as we like it, chocolate can be lethal to our canine friends. Why can we humans eat chocolate without any negative effects (besides cavities), but dogs can't? The answer has to do with a specific component of cocoa, and of course, chemistry. This week, Reactions explains the chemistry behind chocolate poisoning in dogs (and cats).

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Look for El Niño Surprises During the Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 12-15

With the El Niño weather phenomenon warming Pacific waters to temperatures matching the highest ever recorded, participants in the 2016 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC), may be in for a few surprises. The 19th annual GBBC is taking place worldwide February 12 through 15. Information gathered and reported online at birdcount.org will help scientists track changes in bird distribution, some of which may be traced to El Niño storms and unusual weather patterns.

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Exploring the mythology of NGO creation

When the young English woman Eglantyne Jebb decided to hand out leaflets in London’s Trafalgar Square in 1919 protesting the continuing post-war blockade of Greece and the resulting serious food shortages, she was quickly arrested. At trial, she was found guilty – but the prosecuting council was so impressed with her that he offered to pay her fine of five pounds. That money became the first ever donation to Save the Children.

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1 in 292 Million? So What. Even Risk-Averse Humans Are Swept-Up in Powerball, Says UB Psychologist

Humans are, by nature, irrationally risk-averse, says Michael Poulin, associate professor of psychology in the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences.

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Mammograms: Are We Asking the Wrong Question?

Final recommendations released today by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force echo those in 2009 that moved the beginning age for annual mammograms from 40 to 50 and started a national conversation that ignited fear and confusion in women across the country.

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Fish-flavored cat food could contribute to feline hyperthyroidism

Over the past three decades, the number of cats diagnosed with hyperthyroidism has increased. According to research reports, many factors such as exposure to flame retardants could be responsible, and now a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology points in another direction. It suggests that fish-flavored cat food could be among the culprits.

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Waste less at home

Consumer food waste carries the highest environmental impact compared to losses earlier in the food chain, and it is no longer a problem concentrated only in higher income countries. How can household food waste be reduced? The proper answer might come from more research to identify which communication and marketing initiatives work better to decrease waste. In a new paper published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, researcher Gustavo Porpino, from the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) provides some solutions and a framework for conducting future research on this global issue of remarkable social and environmental relevance.

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Lake Superior State University's 41st Annual List of Banished Words

So, if the wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University get their way, this is the last time a story lead like this will ever make it into print or broadcast.

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To bolster a new year's resolution, ask, don't tell

"Will you exercise this year?" That simple question can be a game-changing technique for people who want to influence their own or others' behavior, according to a recent study spanning 40 years of research.

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Compelling New Memoir Addresses Challenges Facing Transgender Individuals in America

In a historic time for the LGBT community in the U.S., activist, writer, and public health consultant Willy Wilkinson’s Born on the Edge of Race and Gender: A Voice for Cultural Competency uses the power of storytelling to educate about one of the most misunderstood social issues today: the needs of transgender individuals.

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Cli-fi is all the rage

It’s some time in the not too distant future. The American mid-west has turned into a dust bowl. Birds are dropping out of the sky. Cities are encapsulated in domes so that people can breathe clean, if recycled, air.

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Seasonal affective disorder: More than just the winter blues (video)

As the days get shorter, darker and colder, people seem to be getting gloomier. For folks with seasonal affective disorder, the changing seasons can make them sadder than most, to the point of depression. Why does this happen? What can someone with the condition do about it? Reactions has the chemistry to explain this disorder and some possible treatments.

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University of Oregon Explores the Growing Gaming Industry with First-Ever Collegiate Gaming Hackathon in United States and Canada

Product innovation around the growing $15 billion gaming industry is the focus of the University of Oregon’s first intercollegiate hackathon. Dubbed QuackHack, the event will take place Jan. 15-17, 2016, at the University of Oregon’s Lundquist College of Business. College students from any university in Oregon, the Northwest, and beyond can register to participate.

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Star Wars science: lightsabers, lasers and force fields (video)

Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens hits movie screens this week with its intense plot, edge-of-your-seat action scenes and, of course, lots of lightsabers. But is it actually possible to create a real-life lightsaber or build a functioning Death Star laser? To answer these questions and more, Reactions explores the science behind the Star Wars franchise.

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Playing 3-D video games can boost memory formation, UCI study finds

Don’t put that controller down just yet. Playing three-dimensional video games – besides being lots of fun – can boost the formation of memories, according to University of California, Irvine neurobiologists.

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Pay it forward: Small favors can yield large returns, study finds

Many people hold the door open for strangers. But what do people give in return?

Their responses appeared to depend on the door holder's effort, according to scientists at the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC. If the door holder made a high effort by making eye contact, smiling and holding open the door, more recipients would say "thank you," researchers found. If the door holder who made a high effort had dropped some pens while trying to hold open the door, the recipient was more likely to stop and help pick them up.

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In social movements, 'slacktivists' matter

You know them well. You might even be one of them.

They're the people who tint their Facebook profile pictures with the French flag to support Parisians, or pink to get behind Planned Parenthood. They sign online petitions, share activist videos, and retweet celebrities who take a political stand. They're willing to lift a finger for a cause -- mainly the one used to tap 'like' or 'share' or "retweet."

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Kitchen chemistry hacks for cooks and wine lovers (video)

Have you ever suspected that your oven is running too hot and burning your baked goods? Are your kitchen knives dull? Or maybe you just opened a bottle of wine that smells less than divine. Reactions' chemistry life hacks series is back to help you solve these culinary challenges, along with the chemistry explanations to back them up:

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Distracted dining? Steer clear of it!

A new University of Illinois study reveals that distracted dining may be as dangerous to your health as distracted driving is to your safety on the highway.

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Why it hurts to eat hot peppers (video)

You have probably had the burning sensation of eating a jalapeno or some other tear-inducing hot pepper. What causes this painful fire in your mouth? The short answer is capsaicin. But what exactly is capsaicin?

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Eight Wild Facts About Wild Turkeys

So you thought there was nothing to know about turkeys except whether you liked drumsticks or white meat. Think again.

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