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Life
 

Is Your Data Safe? Why You Should Care More About Spam

The Center for Research on Electronic Commerce (CREC) at The University of Texas at Austin is working to protect consumer data by using a company's spam volume to evaluate its security vulnerability through the SpamRankings.net project.

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Rising Temperatures Can Be Deadly for Dogs

The "dog days of summer" are here, but don't let the phrase fool you. This hot time of year can be dangerous for your pup, says a Kansas State University veterinarian.

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Study reveals 'unhappiest' cities in the U.S.

New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices.

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For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet
Full story: NPR

Stop Sneaky Online Tracking with EFF's Privacy Badger

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released a beta version of Privacy Badger, a browser extension for Firefox and Chrome that detects and blocks online advertising and other embedded content that tracks you without your permission.

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Born Free USA Collects More Than 100 Furs for Animals in Need

WASHINGTON, D.C. July 21, 2014 - Last week, Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, wrapped up its Fur for the Animals donation drive for coats, hats, and other accessories made from animal fur. The collected items were donated to orphaned wildlife at rescue and rehabilitation centers across the country to provide familiar comfort, warmth, and bedding to injured young wild animals in their care. The Fur for the Animals drive ran from the first day of spring (March 20, 2014) to June 30, 2014.

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Xeriscape Your Yard

If you live in a high precipitation area, perhaps you've installed a lovely rain garden. But what's a good landscaping choice for no rain at all?

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Edie Windsor Talks Love and Struggles in the Workplace in Part 2 of MEUSA Video Series

Today, Marriage Equality USA is proud to release Part 2 in of Edie Windsor: In Her Own Words, a multi-part series of interviews with LGBTQ icon and longtime MEUSA member Edie Windsor.


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Oral history project looks deep into West Coast cocktail culture

California's famous tiki bars of the 1930s and '40s traded on Polynesian enticements, and many of the bartenders mixing the magical Mai Tais were Asian. But chances are the bartenders were never seen by the customers. Racism kept them hidden away in the kitchen; white servers would take drink orders and transmit them through a walkie talkie concealed in a potted fern.

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Veterinarian Says Keep Your Pets Indoors for Fourth of July

You may be looking forward to the fireworks this Fourth of July, but chances are your pet is dreading it, says a Kansas State University veterinarian.

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UC Davis study identifies risky food safety practices in home kitchens

While most consumers are very aware of food safety issues, including salmonella, and the risk of foodborne illness, many do not follow recommended food safety practices in preparing their own meals at home, according to new research from the University of California, Davis.

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FTC Alleges T-Mobile Crammed Bogus Charges onto Customers' Phone Bills

In a complaint filed today, the Federal Trade Commission is charging mobile phone service provider T-Mobile USA, Inc., with making hundreds of millions of dollars by placing charges on mobile phone bills for purported "premium" SMS subscriptions that, in many cases, were bogus charges that were never authorized by its customers.

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U.S. Breweries are Booming According to Census Bureau

The number of U.S. breweries more than doubled — from 398 to 869 — between 2007 and 2012, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released today from the 2012 Economic Census Industry Series. The breweries industry reported $28.3 billion in shipments in 2012, an increase of nearly 33.6 percent since 2007.

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Labor Department to Protect Transgender Workers from Employment Discrimination

Yesterday the Department of Labor announced that it would be updating enforcement protocols and anti-discrimination guidance clarifying the reach of the federal non-discrimination laws enforced by the Department and ensuring full protection for transgender individuals covered by these laws.

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The Chemistry of Fireworks: Fourth of July Science (video)

The Fourth of July is just days away, and that means millions of Americans will soon enjoy eye-popping fireworks displays around the country. These dazzling light shows are actually carefully crafted chemical reactions. This week's Reactions episode features John Conkling, Ph.D., the professor who literally wrote the book on pyrotechnics. In the video, Conkling explains the chemistry that creates those amazing fireworks displays.

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Beach Report: 10 Percent of America's Beach Water Samples Fail Safety Test

Ten percent of all water quality samples collected last year from nearly 3,500 coastal and Great Lakes beaches in the U.S. contained bacteria levels that failed to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's most protective benchmark for swimmer safety. According to the 24th annual beach report released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council, the findings confirm that serious water pollution persists at many U.S. seashores, with massive stormwater runoff and sewage overflows historically being the largest known sources of the problem.

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University of Dayton Becomes First Catholic University to Divest from Fossil Fuels

The University of Dayton, a leading Catholic University and the largest private university in Ohio, announced this morning that it would be divesting its $670 million endowment from fossil fuels.

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Fingers Often Fly High Along With Fireworks, Says Loyola Trauma Surgeon

As Independence Day nears, emergency departments and trauma centers nationwide are already beginning to treat patients injured by fireworks. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, hand and finger damage are the most common injuries caused by fireworks and account for 32 percent of all injuries reported.

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Children consuming a Mediterranean Diet are 15% less likely to be overweight

A study of 8 European countries presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, shows that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15% less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.

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Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America's Largest Metros

Walkable real estate development projects and places are on the rise nationwide, but certain metro regions are progressing faster than others, according to a new report released today by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with LOCUS: Responsible Real Estate Developers and Investors, a program of Smart Growth America.

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Ice cream chemistry: The inside scoop on a classic summer treat (video)

The summer weather is here, and if you've been out in the sun, you're probably craving some ice cream to cool off. In the American Chemical Society's latest Reactions video, American University Assistant Professor Matt Hartings, Ph.D., breaks down the chemistry of this favorite frozen treat, including what makes ice cream creamy or crunchy, and why it is so sweet.

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Powerful New TV Ads Focus on Plight of Polar Bears in Warming World

ore than 450 television stations around the country this week are receiving a powerful new public service announcement from the Center for Biological Diversity highlighting the global climate crisis and its devastating effects on polar bears. The 30- and 60-second spots feature heartbreaking footage of polar bears and melting sea ice and include a call to action to sign a petition to curb global warming.


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Review: French author Philippe Squarzoni condenses the climate saga into a 484-page graphic novel

Try this experiment: Go to the shelves of your nearest chain bookstore or academic library – either will work – and browse the literature section. Flip through a bunch of books; you don't have to read any mystery novels or critical editions of "Anna Karenina." In fact, it's better if you don't. Just take a quick look at what's inside. Then head over to the science section and do the same thing. E.O. Wilson's "The Ants" or the latest issue of "Nature" – again, don't read.

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Clothes Dryers Cost U.S. Consumers Up to $4 Billion in Annual Energy Waste

The clothes dryers in U.S. homes are wasting up to $4 billion worth of electricity annually because energy-saving standards for the common appliance have not been significantly updated for almost 30 years, according to a Natural Resources Defense Council report released today.

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Research highlights why you shouldn't pee in the pool (video)

The swimming pools are open for the season, and that means a chance to splash, play and yes, pee, in the pool. But new research shows swimmers may want to think twice before “going” in the water. Jing Li, Ernest Blatchley and colleagues are reporting that urine mixed with chlorine can produce harmful byproducts. The two main culprits, cyanogen chloride and trichloramine, have been linked to lung problems, as well as heart and nervous system damage. In the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) newest Breakthrough Science video, Blatchley and Li explain how urine causes this reaction, and what swimmers can do to stay safe.

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Fatal falls among older adults rising at an alarming rate

Fatal falls among adults 65 and older have risen 112 percent* since 1999. More than 21,600* deaths in 2010 were attributed to falls among this age group, accounting for eight out of every 10 fatal falls in the United States.

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From Supermarket to Leftovers: A Consumer's Guide to Safer Food

Every year, 48 million Americans will get sick from contaminated food and 3,000 will die from a foodborne illness. Today the nonprofit food safety watchdog group sometimes known as the "food police" is publishing the definitive consumer's guide to avoiding foodborne illness with the latest, science-based advice on how to shop, prep, cook, and store food safely. Written by Sarah Klein, senior food safety attorney for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, From Supermarket to Leftovers ($25, 91 pages) is available today exclusively from NutritionAction.com.

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What causes garlic breath? (video)

Garlic is good for your body, great for your taste buds, but terrible for your breath. In the American Chemical Society’s latest Reactions video, we look at the plant beloved by chefs and feared by vampires. Once again we teamed up with the Compound Interest blog to break down the chemistry of garlic, and how to beat the bad breath it causes.

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100 Deadliest Days For Teen Drivers

According to a 2012 national study by AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, the 100 days between Memorial Day and Labor Day are deadly for teen drivers. An average of 261 teens dies in traffic crashes during each of the summer months, a 26 percent increase compared to the rest of the year. This represents an average of nearly 800 teen deaths during the summer months.

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American Hiking Society Announces its 22nd Annual National Trails Day on June 7

Across America, people of all ages are getting ready to celebrate the great outdoors at this year's National Trails Day®– America's largest annual single-day trails and outdoor celebration. Organized by American Hiking Society, the national nonprofit organization serving as the national voice for hikers, the 22nd annual National Trails Day is set to kick off this year on Saturday, June 7. Hundreds of thousands of hikers, cyclists, paddlers, horseback riders, and volunteers from every state will participate in a wide variety of outdoor activities on land and water trails at more than 2,000 nationally sanctioned events across the land.

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