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Meteor Explodes over Colorado


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By: Spaceweather.com

Dec. 6, 2008 - Last night, Dec. 6th at 1:28 a.m. MST, a fireball one hundred times brighter than the full Moon lit up the sky near Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Astronomer Chris Peterson photographed the event using an all-sky video camera dedicated to meteor studies: movie. "In seven years of operation, this is the brightest fireball I've ever recorded. I estimate the terminal explosion at magnitude -18." Meteors this bright are called superbolides; they are caused by small (meter-class) asteroids and are likely to pepper the ground with meteorites when they explode.

Readers, did you see this fireball? Report your sighting here.

 

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