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Transgender Adults Start as Transgender Kids

Transgender adults start out as transgender youth. “Kids and parents often come to see me in tremendous distress,” says Johanna Olson, MD, director of the Center for Transyouth Health and Development at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. “My job as a pediatrician is to help transgender kids move from ‘survive’ to ‘thrive’.”

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Celestial fireworks celebrate Hubble's 25th anniversary

The glittering tapestry of young stars flaring to life in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image aptly resembles an exploding shell in a fireworks display. This vibrant image of the star cluster Westerlund 2 has been released to celebrate Hubble's 25th year in orbit and a quarter of a century of new discoveries, stunning images and outstanding science.

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How oil damages fish hearts: Five years of research since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Scientists with the Ecotoxicology Program at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle have been working to understand those effects. "Along with our research partners," said Nat Scholz, the scientist who leads the program, "we're investigating the more subtle, lingering, and potentially widespread impacts of oil on the health and survival of fish."

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Sugar and carbs, not physical inactivity, behind surge in obesity, say experts

Excess sugar and carbs, not physical inactivity, are behind the surge in obesity, say experts in an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine published online today.

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World's First Public Testing for Monsanto's Glyphosate Begins Today

The Organic Consumers Association (OCA) today, in conjunction with the Feed The World Project, launched the world’s first glyphosate testing for the general public. The project, with specific focus on women and children in the U.S., is offering the first-ever validated public LC/MS/MS glyphosate testing for urine, water and soon breast milk.

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Humans' ancestors had tentacles

The famous Vitruvian Man, which was drawn by Leonardo da Vinci, pictures the canon of human's proportions. However, humans have become bilaterally symmetric not at once. There are two main points of view on the last common bilaterian ancestor, its appearance and the course of evolution.

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Millimeter-sized stones formed our planet

Fragments of asteroids regularly land on Earth as meteorites. If you examine such a find, you can see that it comprises millimetre-sized round stones, known as chondrules. These small particles are believed to be the original building blocks of the solar system. However, the research community has not previously been able to explain how the chondrules formed asteroids. A new study shows that asteroids were formed by capturing chondrules with the help of gravitational force.

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Planet-sized 'virtual telescope' expands to the South Pole to observe black holes in detail

Astronomers building a globe-spanning virtual telescope capable of photographing the "event horizon" of the black hole at the center of our Milky Way have extended their instrument to incorporate the South Pole Telescope (SPT), a 280-ton radio telescope located at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica.


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No association found between MMR vaccine and autism, even among children at higher risk

In a study that included approximately 95,000 children with older siblings, receipt of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), regardless of whether older siblings had ASD, findings that indicate no harmful association between receipt of MMR vaccine and ASD even among children already at higher risk for ASD, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health.

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Extending climate predictability beyond El Niño

Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists from the USA, Australia, and Japan. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers.

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What's the World's Worst Environmental Problem? We Are

Earth’s worst environmental problems all come down to sheer numbers of human beings, their behavior and their desire for both resources and consumer goods, according to the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s (ESF) Earth Day survey.

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A Somber Anniversary: 100 Years of Chemical Weapons (VIDEO)

April 20th marks the 100th anniversary of the first large-scale use of chemical weapons in warfare. Some of the best minds in chemistry at that time, including a Nobel Prize winner, used their knowledge of science to build humanity's new weapons of mass destruction. Reactions presents this sobering look at the chemistry behind the modern world's first chemical weapons.

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A cold cosmic mystery solved

In 2004, astronomers examining a map of the radiation leftover from the Big Bang (the cosmic microwave background, or CMB) discovered the Cold Spot, a larger-than-expected unusually cold area of the sky. The physics surrounding the Big Bang theory predicts warmer and cooler spots of various sizes in the infant universe, but a spot this large and this cold was unexpected.

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Paternal sperm may hold clues to autism

In a small study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that DNA from the sperm of men whose children had early signs of autism shows distinct patterns of regulatory tags that could contribute to the condition. A detailed report of their findings will be published online in the International Journal of Epidemiology on April 15.

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Giant galaxies die from the inside out

A major astrophysical mystery has centred on how massive, quiescent elliptical galaxies, common in the modern Universe, quenched their once furious rates of star formation. Such colossal galaxies, often also called spheroids because of their shape, typically pack in stars ten times as densely in the central regions as in our home galaxy, the Milky Way, and have about ten times its mass.

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A blueprint for clearing the skies of space debris

An international team of scientists have put forward a blueprint for a purely space-based system to solve the growing problem of space debris. The proposal, published in Acta Astronautica, combines a super-wide field-of-view telescope, developed by RIKEN's EUSO team, which will be used to detect objects, and a recently developed high-efficiency laser system, the CAN laser that was presented in Nature Photonics in 2013, that will be used to track space debris and remove it from orbit.

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Increasing evidence points to inflammation as source of nervous system manifestations of Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. The investigators at the Tulane National Primate Research Center and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center also showed that the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone prevents many of these reactions.

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'Pull my finger!' say scientists who solve knuckle-cracking riddle

“Pull my finger,” a phrase embraced by school-aged kids and embarrassing uncles the world over, is now being used to settle a decades-long debate about what happens when you crack your knuckles.

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NIST Makes 'Bio Inspired' Flame Retardants in a Jiffy

After devising several new and promising "green" flame retardants for furniture padding, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers took a trip to the grocery store and cooked up their best fire-resistant coatings yet. As important, these protective coatings can be made in one straightforward step.

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Swedish and British team solves mystery at heart of "black" auroras

While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of colour are formed, scientists have struggled to explain the black patches between the bright beams. Now Swedish and British scientists have discovered what happens at the heart of these so-called "black aurora".

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First signs of self-interacting dark matter?

Using the MUSE instrument on ESO's VLT in Chile, along with images from Hubble in orbit, a team of astronomers studied the simultaneous collision of four galaxies in the galaxy cluster Abell 3827. The team could trace out where the mass lies within the system and compare the distribution of the dark matter with the positions of the luminous galaxies.

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Research details 40 million-year-old family tree of baleen whales

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago is providing the most comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of baleen whales, which are not only the largest animals ever to live on earth, but also among the most unusual.

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A Story of Ozone: The Earth's Natural Sunscreen (video)

In this talk, Dr. Paul Newman tells the story of how scientists and policy-makers safeguarded the Earth's ozone layer and the world we avoided by regulating chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) . Back in the '60s, we used chlorofluorocarbons, a chlorine-containing chemical, in everything from hairsprays and deodorants to foam products and air conditioners. But in 1974, chemists Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina published a paper claiming CFCs were destroying the ozone layer. The Molina-Rowland paper launched a debate in the scientific community that ultimately led to the halls of the United Nations. Today, more than 191 countries have signed the Montreal Protocol -- a treaty that regulates the use of chlorofluorocarbons -- and the ozone layer is on the mend. But the story has taken a new and unpredictable turn as the class of compounds that replaced CFCs act as greenhouse gases.

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Your Pain Reliever May Also Be Diminishing Your Joy

Researchers studying the commonly used pain reliever acetaminophen found it has a previously unknown side effect: It blunts positive emotions.

In the study, participants who took acetaminophen reported less strong emotions when they saw both very pleasant and very disturbing photos, when compared to those who took placebos.

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Accelerating universe? Not so fast

Certain types of supernovae, or exploding stars, are more diverse than previously thought, a University of Arizona-led team of astronomers has discovered. The results, reported in two papers published in the Astrophysical Journal, have implications for big cosmological questions, such as how fast the universe has been expanding since the Big Bang.

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Our Sun came late to the Milky Way's star-birth party

In one of the most comprehensive multi-observatory galaxy surveys yet, astronomers find that galaxies like our Milky Way underwent a stellar "baby boom," churning out stars at a prodigious rate, about 30 times faster than today.

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'Warm blob' in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US

The one common element in recent weather has been oddness. The West Coast has been warm and parched; the East Coast has been cold and snowed under. Fish are swimming into new waters, and hungry seals are washing up on California beaches.

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Study: Greatest mass extinction 252 million years ago driven by acidic oceans caused by extreme volcanic activity

Changes to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time, a study suggests.

The event, which took place 252 million years ago, wiped out more than 90 per cent of marine species and more than two-thirds of the animals living on land.

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A new view of the moon's formation

Within the first 150 million years after our solar system formed, a giant body roughly the size of Mars struck and merged with Earth, blasting a huge cloud of rock and debris into space. This cloud would eventually coalesce and form the moon.

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Gut Immune System Identified as a New and Effective Target in Treating Diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans.

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