Lone, Modoc

In Contained California Firesby YubaNet

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  • Incident Name: Lone, Modoc
  • State: CA
  • Lead Agency: MDF
  • Size (acres): 5,737
  • Percent Contained: 95%
  • Estimate of Containment: September 16, 2019
  • Personnel: 40
  • Structures Destroyed: 0

Lone, Modoc NF, USFS. Five miles southeast of Clear Lake, CA. Timber, brush and tall grass. Moderate fire behavior with smoldering. Sage-grouse habitat threatened.

 

September 13, 2019 at 9:26 AM

The Lone Fire is holding at 5,737 acres and is now 95-percent contained. No further fire growth is expected.

Some interior fuels burning out continue to generate smoke.
This is the final update for the Lone Fire. The Modoc National Forest would like to thank the public and local agencies for their support during this incident.

September 11, 2019 at 7:40 AM

Containment of the 5,737 acre Lone Fire has reached 92-percent. The current type-3 management team transferred command of the fire to a type-4 team at 6 a.m. this morning. The incoming team is a smaller organization formed to manage incidents of a lower complexity.

Smoldering fuels within the perimeter are expected to produce smoke for a few more days.

September 10, 2019 at 7:35 AM

The Lone Fire is now 87-percent contained and remains at 5,737 acres. Today as firefighters patrol and extinguish hot spots the primary control objective is to keep the fire within the current perimeter. There are still some smoldering fuels near the line, but this is becoming less of an issue as the vegetation is fully consumed or extinguished.

As progress is made and resources are no longer needed on the fire, they are released to their home unit or to assist with other active fires. Staffing on the fire has decreased to 57 from a high of 136.

There is a slight chance of thunderstorms today, but only a 5-percent chance of any wetting rain over the fire. Wind from these storms could challenge the fire line.

September 9, 2019 at 7:22 AM

Fire behavior has been minimal on the Lone Fire allowing firefighters to make good progress toward full containment. Today firefighters will continue to patrol the fire area, extinguish hot spots and improve containment line.

Though temperatures have decreased and relative humidity has increased, the potential for spot fires across the line still exists. The primary concern is that higher winds accompanying a low pressure system may blow embers across the line into unburned vegetation. Resources are available for a rapid attack should spot fires occur.

The fire is projected to be fully contained Sept. 12, 2019.

September 8, 2019 at 7:29 PM

Fire behavior was minimal today on the Lone Fire. The fire now covers 5,737 acres and remains 55-percent contained.

Firefighters patrolled the line and extinguished hot spots. With higher winds in the forecast containment lines could be tested. The primary concern is the potential of embers blowing over the line from a burning juniper tree and igniting spot fires.

Smoke will continue to be visible in the area over the next few days as vegetation in the interior of the burn is consumed.

September 8, 2019 at 8:53 AM

Firefighters taking advantage of favorable weather conditions have made significant progress in the effort to contain the Lone Fire.

In the absence of hot, dry weather the fire burned with less intensity allowing access to the line directly on the fire’s edge. Hand crews, engines and bulldozers working the fire were supported by two large air tankers and a helicopter as they constructed containment line along the perimeter of the 5,628 acre fire.

The weather is expected to remain cool well into next week resulting in less active fire behavior but winds are still a concern. With pockets of heat near the fire’s edge the threat of fire spread remains. Moving forward the focus continues to be the construction of containment line and extinguishment of any heat found near the edge of the fire.

September 7, 2019 at 8:13 PM

Significant progress was made today in the effort to contain the Lone Fire. Firefighters were able to take advantage of favorable weather conditions and construct fire line around 45-percent of the perimeter.

In the absence of hot, dry weather the fire burned with less intensity allowing firefighters to access the line directly on the fire’s edge. Hand crews, engines and bulldozers working the fire were supported by two large air tankers and a helicopter. The growth of the fire was limited to 533 acres. Total acreage is now 5,553 and much of the active fire is now burning well within the fire perimeter.

The cooler weather is expected to continue through the weekend.

September 7, 2019 at 2:24 PM

Firefighters are using bulldozers, hand crews to build line along the edges of the Lone Fire. Low humidity and high winds are expected today. These conditions bring with them the potential for additional fire growth. Wide fire retardant lines are being applied by large air tankers, single engine air tankers (SEATS), and a helicopter with the purpose limiting fire spread as winds develop. On the ground, bulldozers are building fire line directly at the fire’s edge where possible.

The fire has exhibited extreme fire behavior when pushed by wind, spotting ahead of itself and growing quickly. Progress has been made in the construction of the initial lines on the fire but rapid fire spread has made it challenging. Additional resources have been ordered to assist with fighting the Lone Fire.

September 7, 2019 at 9:46 AM

Higher temperatures and decreased humidity along with strong winds pushed the Lone Fire to 4,600 acres yesterday. One helicopter and several air tankers, including a DC-10 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT), responded and made multiple retardant drops. Additional helicopters have been ordered to assist the 119 personnel assigned to the incident.

In addition to the weather, lack of access for fire equipment made it difficult for firefighters to make headway. Firefighters continue to scout the area for natural barriers and roads that can be used as fire containment line.

This lightning-caused fire is burning in grass and juniper in the area of Pinnacle Lake. Since the initial report on Sept. 5 the fire has grown over 2,000 acres per day.

Since Thursday’s thunderstorms 20 fires have been discovered on the forest, nine of these remain uncontrolled. Good progress was made Friday on several of the small fires. Five incidents were declared “controlled/contained”, and two were declared out. All but one of these fires were less than one quarter of an acre.

September 6, 2019 at 7:46 PM

The Lone Fire grew by over 2,000 acres today. Higher temperatures and decreased humidity along with strong winds pushed the fire to 4,600 acres.

In addition to the weather, a lack of adequate roads for fire equipment to access the fire made it difficult for firefighters to make headway. One helicopter and several air tankers, including a DC-10 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT), responded and made multiple retardant drops on the fire.

Additional helicopters have been ordered to assist the 119 personnel assigned to the incident.

This lightning-caused fire is burning in grass and juniper in the area of Pinnacle Lake. Since the initial report on Sept. 5 the fire has grown over 2,000 acres per day and is currently the largest fire burning on the Modoc National Forest.

September 6, 2019 at 8:09 AM

Thunderstorms moved over the Modoc National Forest as predicted on Thursday keeping fire resources busy throughout the day. Firefighters discovered 17 new wildfires on the forest.

The largest is the Lone Fire (T45N R8E Sec16), burning in grass and juniper 1.5 miles south of Pinnacle Lake. The fire was reported at 4:14 p.m. and grew quickly. At last report, an estimated 2,592 acres had burned with no containment.

Most reported fires were found to be single trees and were reported contained yesterday. One other fire, the Swamp Fire (T44N R11E Sec4), discovered northwest of Ingall Swamp and southwest of Dorris Brothers Reservoir, was held at just under ten acres with 90-percent containment. Firefighters will continue work toward full containment today.

Friday’s weather is expected to be clear and warm. This will increase the potential of holdover fires following today’s storm. In anticipation of potentially high fire activity the forest has expanded its firefighting capability by bringing in additional resources including four hand crews and five engines from other forests to assist with response.