Aftermath of DART Collision with Dimorphos Captured by SOAR Tele

This image taken by the SOAR Telescope in Chile, operated by NSF’s NOIRLab, shows a side view of the streams of material from the surface of Dimorphos -- captured two days after the asteroid was intentionally impacted by NASA’s DART spacecraft. On the right, the material is forming a more than 9600-km-long comet-like tail, pushed into shape by pressure from the Sun’s radiation.

Astronomers using the NSF’s NOIRLab’s SOAR telescope in Chile captured the vast plume of dust and debris blasted from the surface of the asteroid Dimorphos by NASA’s DART spacecraft when it impacted on 26 September 2022. In this image, the more than 10,000 kilometer long dust trail — the ejecta that has been pushed away by the Sun’s radiation pressure, not unlike the tail of a comet — can be seen stretching from the center to the right-hand edge of the field of view. Credit: CTIO/NOIRLab/SOAR/NSF/AURA/T. Kareta (Lowell Observatory), M. Knight (US Naval Academy)

This image taken by the SOAR Telescope in Chile, operated by NSF’s NOIRLab, shows a side view of the streams of material from the surface of Dimorphos — captured two days after the asteroid was intentionally impacted by NASA’s DART spacecraft. On the right, the material is forming a more than 9600-km-long comet-like tail, pushed into shape by pressure from the Sun’s radiation.

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