RumCreekFireBrettBriefing_0

Incident Meteorologist (IMET) Brett Lutz provides a weather briefing to firefighters at the Rum Creek Fire in southwest Oregon on August 29, 2022. IMETs typically work 16-hour days for up to 14 days straight. The large map behind Lutz is updated and posted daily to show where the fire has progressed, different fire management tactics that have been used and where firefighting efforts will take place. Weather forecasts from IMETs, along with information about terrain and ground cover type, give analysts an idea of how fast and how far a fire may move. This information gives operations personnel a baseline when deciding fire suppression and safety measures. (Robert Hyatt, NOAA’s National Weather Service)

Incident Meteorologist (IMET) Brett Lutz provides a weather briefing to firefighters at the Rum Creek Fire in southwest Oregon on August 29, 2022. IMETs typically work 16-hour days for up to 14 days straight. The large map behind Lutz is updated and posted daily to show where the fire has progressed, different fire management tactics that have been used and where firefighting efforts will take place. Weather forecasts from IMETs, along with information about terrain and ground cover type, give analysts an idea of how fast and how far a fire may move. This information gives operations personnel a baseline when deciding fire suppression and safety measures. (Robert Hyatt, NOAA’s National Weather Service)

Incident Meteorologist (IMET) Brett Lutz provides a weather briefing to firefighters at the Rum Creek Fire in southwest Oregon on August 29, 2022. IMETs typically work 16-hour days for up to 14 days straight. The large map behind Lutz is updated and posted daily to show where the fire has progressed, different fire management tactics that have been used and where firefighting efforts will take place. Weather forecasts from IMETs, along with information about terrain and ground cover type, give analysts an idea of how fast and how far a fire may move. This information gives operations personnel a baseline when deciding fire suppression and safety measures. (Robert Hyatt, NOAA’s National Weather Service)

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