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SACRAMENTO October 21, 2020 – Governor Gavin Newsom yesterday announced the retirement of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Commissioner Warren Stanley following nearly four decades of service to the people of California. The Governor also announced the appointment of CHP Deputy Commissioner Amanda Ray as the next CHP Commissioner effective November 17, making her the first woman and second African American ever to lead the agency.  

“I thank Commissioner Stanley for his distinguished service at the head of the California Highway Patrol,” said Governor Newsom. “As the leader of the fifth-largest law enforcement agency in the country, Commissioner Stanley championed causes to enhance public safety for everyone who travels on California’s roads and freeways. We are grateful for his forward-looking vision and pursuit of innovative strategies to prevent injuries and save lives. I am confident that Deputy Commissioner Ray will be a crucial partner as we continue the important work ahead to strengthen community engagement in public safety and advance reforms to our criminal justice system that will help foster a more just and inclusive future for all Californians.” 

Commissioner Stanley has served the people of California within the CHP since 1982 – and has held every uniformed rank within the department, including Lieutenant of the Border Division Investigative Services Unit and Commander of the California Highway Patrol Academy. 

“I’m very proud of my career, but what I’m most proud of is the current and past CHP employees who I have had the privilege and honor to work with,” said CHP Commissioner Stanley. “All of you are the primary reason I believe the CHP is one of the finest law enforcement agencies in the world. I also want to thank Governor Newsom for his support of me, the 11,000 women and men of the CHP and for selecting Deputy Commissioner Amanda Ray as the next CHP Commissioner.”

During his tenure, Commissioner Stanley spearheaded a number of innovative highway and traffic safety initiatives. Under his leadership, CHP created the Impaired Driving Section, which is responsible for revising current enforcement policies to ensure they are consistent with a new law that approved the adult use of cannabis and facilitate new research into how cannabis affects driving behaviors. Commissioner Stanley also worked to bolster the Highway Safety Corridor Program, which has promoted education, enforcement and coordination on California’s roadways with high crash rates. He also helped the CHP establish a national leadership role in addressing the special needs and concerns of elderly drivers and collaborated on initiatives to promote responsible driving among teens.

“I would like to thank Governor Newsom for the outstanding opportunity to lead this great Department and to continue to work each day with the women and men of the California Highway Patrol. I couldn’t be more honored and proud to accept this appointment and further the CHP’s mission of providing the highest level of Safety, Service and Security, and ensuring California is a safe place to live, work and travel,” said Deputy Commissioner Amanda Ray.

Amanda L. Ray, 54, of Sacramento, has been Deputy Commissioner of the California Highway Patrol since 2020. She served in several positions in the California Highway Patrol from 1990 to 2020, including Cadet, Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, Assistant Chief, Chief and Assistant Commissioner. Ray was Special Response Team Tactical Commander at the California Highway Patrol for Superbowl 50 in 2016. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $282,528. Ray is a Democrat.