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Fire at a glance (numbers)

  • Incident Name:
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Orleans Complex, (3 fires). Six Rivers NF. Twenty miles north of Orleans, CA. Timber and brush. Minimal fire behavior with backing.

September 30, 2017 at 10:14 AM

This is the 64th day of the Orleans Complex fires. This will be the last published Fire Update. The Orleans Complex total acreage is unchanged at 27,276 acres. All fires in the complex are 100% complete. Fire suppression operations have been completed and fire crews are focusing on the remaining suppression repairs. Resources that are no longer needed are being demobilized from the incident. On Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 0700 hours, management of the incident will transition back to the Orleans District to a type III organization. Fire personnel would like to remind the public that hunting season has started. Contact your local ranger station for current hunting information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are cautioned that there will still be numerous firefighting vehicles and heavy equipment on the roadway. Please drive safely. Temperatures are expected to rise approximately 5 degrees per day and humidity will continue to drop into early next week. Winds are predicted to be terrain driven and light. No critical fire weather is expected in the fire area. Effective September 23, all forest closure orders around the Ukonom and Haypress Fires on the Orleans Complex of the Ukonom District are terminated. Firefighters and equipment are still working on mop up and repair operations in many areas.

September 24, 2017 at 9:03 AM

The Orleans Complex is unchanged at 27,276 acres. The Haypress Fire, the largest in the complex, is 66% complete. The other fires within the complex are 100% complete. Fire crews are using favorable weather to finish direct lines and continue with suppression repair.

Safety: Fire personnel would like to remind the public that hunting season has started. Contact your local ranger station for current hunting information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are cautioned that there will still be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with care.

Weather: The cool and wet pattern is expected to end and a warming and drying trend will begin. Temperatures will rise approximately 5 degrees per day and humidity will drop into early next week.

September 23, 2017 at 9:54 AM

The Forest closure orders for the Klamath and Six Rivers National Forests have been terminated effective Saturday, September 23rd. The trails, roads and lands of the Ukonom Ranger District that were closed as a result of the Orleans Complex fires are open to the public. Fire Fighters and equipment are still working on mop up and fire suppression repair operations in many areas so please drive safely.

September 21, 2017 at 10:01 AM

The Orleans Complex is currently 27,224 acres and is 53% completed. The Haypress Fire, the largest in the complex, has burned 21,075 acres and has increased to 35% completed. Precipitation last night minimized fire behavior and will continue to inhibit growth on the Orleans Complex. Resources continue suppression repair and take advantage of favorable weather conditions to complete direct line. Continued emphasis on direct line and suppression repair remain the priorities. Repair work has begun on some dozer lines and roads, as conditions allow.

Safety: Fire weakened trees and snags from previous fires, present aerial hazards to fire suppression personnel. Due to the increase in precipitation, slides and debris will also be contributing hazardous conditions. Hunting season is currently open and portions of the Six Rivers and Klamath National Forests are closed. Firefighters are continuing suppression and repair activities in forest closures areas. Contact your local ranger station for current closure information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with caution.

Weather: Rainy conditions expected throughout Wednesday. Gusty west winds are possible along the ridge tops otherwise winds will be light from the west through much of the week.

September 17, 2017 at 9:58 AM

Hunting season is currently open. Firefighters are conducting suppression activities in hunting areas. Portions of the Six Rivers and Klamath National Forests are closed. Contact your local ranger station for current closure information.

Current Fire Situation: The most active fire on the Orleans Complex, continues to be the Haypress Fire at 20,993 acres. The Orleans Complex is currently at 27,142 acres and 53% complete and has been burning since mid-July due to multiple lightning strikes in the area.

The potential for rain and a low-pressure passage on the way, will help inhibit fire growth on the Orleans Complex. The fire is hung up in the Wooley Creek area on the east flank, but continued spread further east is unlikely. The southern portion of the fire could burn in Deer Lick Creek with movement south down Wooley Creek and the Salmon River.

Evacuations: An evacuation warning remains in effect for residents east of Highway 96 from Burns Creek south to Somes Bar, and along the Salmon River Road to Wooley Creek. Residents can stay informed of changing conditions by calling the fire information number (530-572-1129) or going to http://www.facebook.com/SixRiversNF orhttps://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5430/.

Air quality: Expect westerly winds to bring cleaner air to the Lower Klamath River drainage between Willow Creek to Orleans. Seiad Valley and Happy Camp are forecast to be “Unhealthy” due to proximity to the fires. To view more on current air quality conditions and what they mean please visithttps://www.wildlandfiresmoke.net/moniotoring/

Weather: An anticipated low pressure front could produce westerly winds in the next couple of days.

Temperatures will be cooler and wetter pattern is expected tomorrow as a large low-pressure system approaches the west coast. Very light rain is possible Monday and Tuesday. Some gusty west winds are possible along the ridge tops, otherwise winds will be light and from the west through much of next week.

Safety: Extremely steep and rugged terrain poses a threat to firefighters. Fire weakened green trees along with snags from previous fires, continue to fall, and present aerial hazards to fire suppression personnel. Debris and slides from precipitation causes additional hazards.

Contact your local ranger station for current closure information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with caution. Should the fire reach the road, drivers can expect periods of limited visibility and possible traffic controls, including controlled traffic and potential intermittent hard closures.

Closures: The Klamath National Forest has issued Closure Order No. 17-05-801 to close trails, roads, and lands on the Ukonom Ranger District as a result of Orleans Complex fires:

Closure: http://bit.ly/2xDQhof
Map: http://bit.ly/2wfNCBD

Closure Order No. 17-05-797 closes a portion of the Ukonom and Happy Camp Ranger Districts northeast of the Ukonom Fire

Closure: http://bit.ly/2wAbXVt
Map: http://bit.ly/2ggLi9N

Fire Restrictions: The Six Rivers National Forest remains under fire restrictions to provide for public and resource safety (http://bit.ly/2wfQ7Ed).

September 13, 2017 at 7:50 AM

There will be a community meeting at the Tully Creek Fire Hall on Thursday September 14, at 3:00pm, for information about the Orleans Complex. The Forks fire repair is completed. Repair group will move into the Haypress Fire to further assist with repairing impacted areas. Smoke from fires in the surrounding area could continue to cause moderate to unhealthy conditions.

September 9, 2017 at 12:18 PM

There will be a 3:00pm public meeting in Orleans today at the Karuk DNR Building.  The purpose of the meeting is to provide an update about the status of the fires in the Orleans Complex and to answer questions.

Evacuations: At noon yesterday the mandatory evacuation order was lifted for zones 3 and 4, with an exception for the residents in the Patterson Road area. An advisory evacuation warning remains in effect for residents east of Highway 96 from Burns Creek south to Somes Bar, and along the Salmon River Road to Wooley Creek. Residents can stay informed of changing conditions by calling the fire information number (530-572-1129) or by watching for updates at http://www.facebook.com/SixRiversNF or https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5430/

In late July and early August a series of thunderstorms passed through northern California igniting many fires, including nineteen that are being managed as the Orleans Complex.  The three largest are: the Haypress Fire at 20,356 acres, the Ukonom Fire at 4,234 acres, and the Burney Fire at 1,631 acres. The complex is being managed using a combination of full suppression, containment and confinement strategies; this work is estimated to be about 53% complete. A wildfire is contained when a control line has been completed around the fire, which can reasonably be expected to stop the fire’s spread.  Confinement means that a wildfire has been restricted to a defined area, primarily using natural barriers that are expected to halt the spread of the fire under the prevailing and forecasted weather conditions.  Some suppression actions may be required to augment or connect natural barriers, including line construction, strategic firing, and/or bucket drops. Incident objectives are focused on providing for firefighter and public safety, protecting private property and cultural resources, and minimizing impacts to aquatic species, spotted owl habitat and bald eagle habitat. 

There has been minimal fire behavior as clear skies and increased winds blew the thunderstorm threat out yesterday.  Work continues around structures along Highway 96 from Somes Bar north to Burns Creek. The precipitation from Thursday’s showers slowed fire behavior significantly, which has given firefighters an opportunity to begin constructing more direct fire lines. They are identifying locations where they can connect existing fire lines, old roads, and ridgelines to create firebreaks along the western edge of the Haypress Fire. A firebreak is a natural or constructed barrier used to stop or check fires, or to provide a control line from which to work. No significant activity was reported on the Ukonom or Burney Fires.

September 8, 2017 at 8:18 AM

Much of the fire experienced precipitation (0.25″ – 0.35″) throughout the morning that moderated temperatures and fire behavior. Any thunderstorms that develop may produce brief heavy rain, small hail, abundant lightning and gusty and erratic outflow winds. From Saturday through Monday, a gradual warming and drying trend is expected. Fire weakened trees and snags from previous fires along with extremely steep and rugged terrain continues to pose a threat to firefighters.

Haypress-Point Protection-20356 Acres-0 Percent Complete

Ukonom-Confine-4234 Acres-52 Percent Complete

Burney-Confine-1631 Acres-0 Percent Complete

Forks-Confine-242 Acres-0 Percent Complete

Frank-Confine-27 Acres-0 Percent Complete

Hooligan-Confine-.1 Acres-0 Percent Complete

The remaining 13 fires in this complex have been contained.

September 6, 2017 at 9:35 AM

The Ukonom Fire is 4,234 acres; Haypress Fire is 13,782 acres; Burney Fire is 1,451 acres. The complex is being managed using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Evacuations: A mandatory evacuation order is in effect for residents east of Highway 96 between Rogers Creek Road (FR 12N52) and Ti Creek. An advisory evacuation warning remains in effect for residents east of Highway 96 from Burns Creek south to Ti Creek, from Rogers Creek Road south to Somes Bar, and along the Salmon River Road to Wooley Creek. Residents can stay informed of changing conditions by calling the fire information number (530-572-1129) or by watching for updates at http://www.facebook.com/SixRiversNF orhttps://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5430/

Current Fire Situation: Around 10 pm, clouds covered the area and winds settled down decreasing the fire’s activity. The fire showed moderate activity overnight. As of this morning, no structures have been reported damaged or destroyed.

In the area north of Merrill Mountain, the fire backed and flanked across the slope. Burning material rolled off the hill side igniting vegetation, though little progression was observed into the Merrill Creek drainage.

The fire continued to back down slowly in the Stanshaw Creek drainage, with the most activity on the southern side of the creek. As of this morning, the fire is approximately ½ mile from the closest structures, which is very little change since yesterday.

No significant activity was reported on the Ukonom Fire. No observation of the Burney Fire has been possible since the infrared plane has been unavailable.

Weather: Increased atmospheric instability brings mostly cloudy skies and a chance of thunderstorms into the fire area today. Any thunderstorms that develop will be capable of producing brief, moderate rain, numerous lightning strikes, and gusty, erratic outflow winds. Cooler temperatures and higher relative humidity can be expected.

Air quality: Better smoke dispersion is expected for today compared to the previous few days. This will bring some relief especially to the Orleans, Weitchpec, Hoopa and Willow Creek area. However, Happy Camp, Seiad Valley, Sawyers Bar and Etna is forecast to be in Hazardous category today. Yreka, Fort Jones and Etna reached Hazardous level yesterday due to smoke coming from the west. With better dispersion, Fort Jones and Yreka is forecast to be in the Unhealthy category for today.

Safety: Bow hunting season is open. Firefighters may be conducting suppression activities in hunting areas. Portions of the Six Rivers and Klamath National Forests are closed. Contact your local ranger station for current closure information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with caution. Should the fire reach the road, drivers can expect periods of limited visibility and possible traffic controls, including controlled traffic and potential intermittent hard closures.

September 4, 2017 at 9:13 AM

Evacuations: An advisory evacuation warning is in effect on the Orleans Complex east of Highway 96 from Burns Creek south to Somes Bar, and along the Salmon River Road to Wooley Creek.

Current Fire Situation: Predicted northeast winds picked up overnight, causing a moderate increase in fire behavior. Gusts to 25 mph were observed at the Ukonom Lookout.

The Haypress Fire spread predominantly to the west overnight. On the southwestern edge of the fire, crews observed three distinct areas where the fire is moving through heavy timber stands on Merrill Mountain and on the northeastern side of Merrill Creek. Fire behavior was moderate, with small groups of trees torching and causing short uphill runs. Little growth was observed after 2am, when the winds calmed and the heavy smoke inversion set in.

The fire also pushed north and west of Irving Mountain, and crews worked overnight to clear around the Stanshaw Creek Trailhead. Low intensity fire did move through the area, but no damage has been reported at this time. Crews continued to work arounds structures, primarily in the Marble Mountain Ranch and Patterson areas. The fire did not make a huge push, but is currently along the 13N11 road where it has crossed the road in several places.

Today, crews will focus in areas along Highway 96 and Salmon River road to reinforce protection for structures in the area.

No activity was observed on the Burney Fire, but the lack of infrared mapping is making fire observation difficult in remote areas.

Weather: A Red Flag Warning will remain in place until 9 am today for gusty winds and low relative humidity. Winds are expected to weaken this afternoon, and shift to the north across higher elevations. Weak up valley winds will persist at lower elevations. Subtropical moisture moving into California has already produced thunderstorms and lightning across the state. Thunderstorms, with accompanying gusty outflow winds and dry lightning, are predicted to arrive in the fire area this afternoon or evening.

September 4, 2017 at 7:55 AM

Ukonom Fire: 4227 acres; Burney Fire: 1451 acres; Haypress Fire: 11,591 acres

September 3, 2017 at 10:45 AM

The Ukonom Fire is 4,227 acres; Haypress Fire is 11,318 acres; Burney Fire is 1,451 acres. The complex is being managed using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Fire behavior has been moderated by a heavy smoke inversion that persisted yesterday and through the night.

An advisory evacuation warning will be issued today for residents east of Highway 96 from Burns Creek south to Somes Bar, and along the Salmon River Road from Somes Bar to Wooley Creek. Today, residents can expect to see local law enforcement and fire staff at their properties. At this time, the fire is not spreading quickly. This is an advisory evacuation warning. The evacuation warning was triggered by burning material rolling from the uphill side of Forest Road (FR) 3N11 and igniting unburned vegetation below. A northeast wind event is predicted for today, which could cause the fire to spread towards Highway 96. Please contact the Fire Information Line at 619-359-3415 or 530-572-1129 (new today) with questions or concerns.

Overnight, the smoke lifted periodically for firefighters to observe the fire moving west and south around Merrill Mountain. Crews worked to contain spot fires west of Irving Mountain. Road access to those spot fires is compromised by numerous snags. Crews will assess and remove snags today to keep the roads passable. More spot fires are likely in the area. Today, firefighters will work on preparing for structural protection in the evacuation warning area. This includes clearing brush, opening and improving previously built firelines, setting up sprinklers and hoselays, and installing temporary water tanks. Residents are encouraged to take any action that they can to improve their properties, as firefighting resources are extremely limited due to the large number of emergency incidents across the country. Fire Information Officers are available to answer any questions.

The Ukonom Fire continued minimal burning in timber stands north and east of Lick and Ukonom Creeks, but no significant growth was observed. The Burney Fire is in the wilderness with minimal activity.

Weather: Smoky, dry conditions are expected to persist through the day, with temperatures moderated if the smoke inversion stays in place. Typical weak northeast winds in the morning will shift to northwest in the afternoon. Tonight, into Monday morning, critical fire weather conditions are possible as gusty northeast to east winds develop and low relative humidity continues.

September 1, 2017 at 9:57 AM

The Orleans Complex is comprised of nineteen fires, three of which remain active. The Ukonom Fire is 4,195 acres and is 52 percent contained. The Haypress Fire is 8,520 acres and 0 percent contained. The Burney Fire is 1,395 acres and 0 percent contained. The complex is being managed using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Current Fire Situation: While the smoke inversion stayed heavy around Orleans yesterday, northeast winds on the fire area caused considerable increase in fire activity late yesterday afternoon through the night.

The wind caused spotting on the northwest edge of the Haypress Fire over Forest Road (FR) 15N17 near Irving Mountain at about 8pm last night. The steep terrain and active fire behavior prevented night shift crews from continuing suppression directly on the fires edge. They backed off and began to look for opportunities for containment farther west. On the southwestern edge, the fire was relatively quiet until about 2am, when it began to spread actively. Several fingers of fire moving through stands of heavy timber, including south of Rogers Creek and around Merrill Mountain. Due to hazardous conditions, firefighters were unable to stay actively engaged directly on the fireline there as well. They worked on continuing improvements on FR 12N02 and looked for other opportunities for containment. Fire reached the cabins near Wooley Creek several days ago, and crews in the area were able to successfully burn out around them. They have mopped up and assured containment, and are scheduled to hike out today. The area will continue to be monitored for changes in fire activity.

Activity on the Ukonom Fire also picked up overnight, with a small finger moving southwest toward Ukonom Mountain. It has not crossed any control lines. Crews will continue to monitor its activity. They are prepared to conduct burning operations along FR 13N08 to keep up with fire spread.

The Burney Fire continues to be relatively inactive; with only minimal growth showing on the northwestern edge.

Weather: A Red Flag Warning remains in effect today for hot, dry temperatures and strong ridgetop winds. Gusty northeast winds are expected to continue into this afternoon, then switch to the more typical northerly winds.

August 30, 2017 at 7:49 AM

Areas in the vicinity of the fires continue to be impacted by smoke, with a pattern of smoky days that clear out from the evening into the morning. Yesterday saw more clearing than in previous days and similar conditions can be expected again today. Air quality is worst during peaks in the late morning into the afternoon for all areas. During the day, Happy Camp and Seiad Valley will see the worst air quality and will be Very Unhealthy overall. Yreka, Weed, the Scott Valley, Callahan, Sawyers Bar, and Orleans will mainly see Unhealthy with potential for some Very Unhealthy conditions at times. Weitchpec, Willow Creek, and Hoopa can expect Moderate to USG overall with potential for some Unhealthy levels in the afternoon. Weaverville is expected to have Good air quality today but may see some periods of Moderate levels. Drivers should be aware of limited visibility and changes in traffic flow.

August 29, 2017 at 9:18 AM

The Orleans Complex is comprised of nineteen fires, three of which remain active. The Ukonom Fire is 4,176 acres and is 52 percent contained. The Haypress Fire is 5,387 acres and 0 percent contained. The Burney Fire is 1,360 acres and 0 percent contained. The complex is being managed using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Current Fire Situation: Fire activity increased on both the Ukonom and Haypress Fires late yesterday afternoon as the persistent heavy smoke inversion finally lifted.

In the Marble Mountain Wilderness, the Haypress Fire continues to grow northeast up Haypress Creek, across Halfmoon Creek, and toward Round Meadow. Some spotting was observed ahead of the main fire. Favorable conditions overnight allowed firefighters to conduct burning operations on the southwest side of the fire along Forest Road 12N48 south toward Forest Road 12N02. The goal is to tie the fireline into Forest Road 12N26 and to contain the west/southwestern edge of the fire along Forest Road 15N17. Firefighters observed primarily low intensity understory burning with only isolated tree torching. They will continue that operation into this morning for as long as weather conditions permit.

The Ukonom Fire showed little growth overall yesterday, and infrared mapping shows the only remaining heat near the southeast edge of the fire west of Lick and Ukonom Creeks. Some previously unburned islands of vegetation inside the fire perimeter ignited yesterday afternoon. Residents should expect to see smoke from interior burning that is expected to continue into the foreseeable future. However, no activity was observed outside the control area.

Weather: Temperatures are predicted to be slightly cooler today as a weak trough moves across the Pacific Northwest. Strong high pressure is expected to build over the area beginning Thursday, bringing very high temperatures and low relative humidity back into the area.

Air quality: Areas in the vicinity of the fires continue to be impacted by smoke. Smoke stays heavy during the days, and clears during the evening. Conditions generally stay clear through the night and into the morning. Similar conditions can be expected today. Air quality is worst during peaks in the afternoon for all areas. During the day, Happy Camp, Orleans, and Weitchpec will spend most of their time in Very Unhealthy and Hazardous conditions. Yreka, the Scott Valley, Weed, Etna, and Callahan will see Unhealthy and Very Unhealthy levels, and Hoopa and Willow Creek can expect Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups and Unhealthy air quality. Areas adjacent and close to the fires will continue to see the worst air quality. Drivers should be aware of limited visibility and changes in traffic flow. Information on the health effects of smoke and what you can do to reduce your smoke exposure can be found at [https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/smoke.html].

Safety: Bow hunting season is open. Firefighters may be conducting suppression activities in hunting areas. Portions of the Six Rivers and Klamath National Forests are closed. Contact your local ranger station for current closure information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with caution.

August 27, 2017 at 10:54 AM

The Orleans Complex is comprised of nineteen total fires. As of August 27, 2016, thirteen of these have been contained. Six remain active: Ukonom (4,120 acres, 52 percent contained); Haypress (4,555 acres, 0 percent contained); Burney (1,342 acres, 0 percent contained); Forks (243 acres, 0 percent contained); Frank (27 acres, 0 percent contained); and Hooligan (0.1 acres, 0 percent contained). They are being managed using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Current Fire Situation: The fires were relatively inactive yesterday as a heavy smoke inversion stayed over the area until late afternoon. On the Haypress Fire, crews began preparing for and initiating tactical firing operations late yesterday afternoon, hoping to take advantage of favorable nighttime conditions to carefully bring fire along Forest Road 15N17. However, humidity rose quickly, and firefighters were only able to make limited progress. Fire along Forest Road 12N08 continued to back slowly toward the road overnight. The cabins on the southeastern side of the Haypress Fire (along Wooley Creek) have had low-intensity fire around them and are faring well. Crews are remaining in place at the cabins to provide structure protection as needed. Some minimal growth on the north end was observed overnight as well. Crews will work today to look at opportunities for containment in the drainage north of, and along, Forest Road 12N02, as well as on the north end of the fire.

The Ukonom Fire also showed minimal growth yesterday, with the most activity observed again on the southeast corner where it bumps against Lick Creek. Containment objectives for the Ukonom Fire include keeping it east of Ukonom and Lick Creeks, and within current containment lines on the north and west sides. Firefighters will continue to mop up and patrol those areas today. They will also begin suppression repair, which can include covering lines opened during fire suppression, creating waterbars, and removing berms to prevent future erosion.

Throughout the fire area, crews are coordinating with local advisors to ensure that all operations are conducted in the best interest of the area’s cultural and natural resources, while providing for firefighter safety.

Weather: Hotter, drier temperatures are expected to persist today as a mid-level ridge strengthens today. The ridge is predicted to weaken early this week, causing slightly cooler temperatures, higher humidity, and scattered afternoon clouds.

Air Quality: Areas in the vicinity of the fires were impacted heavily by smoke yesterday, and can expect similar conditions today. Areas closest to and adjacent from the fires will continue to see the worst air quality. Smoke will settle in valleys but is expected to begin mixing out in the afternoon into the evening. Happy Camp, Seiad Valley, the Scott Valley, Yreka, Sawyers Bar, Orleans, Hoopa Valley, and Weitchpec can expect from Unhealthy to Sensitive Groups to Hazardous Conditions. Air quality in Weed, Callahan, and Willow Creek will likely have Good to Unhealthy to Sensitive Groups levels. Drivers should be aware of limited visibility and changes in traffic flow.

Information on the health effects of smoke and what you can do to reduce your smoke exposure can be found at [https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/smoke.html].

Safety: Bow hunting season is open. Firefighters may be conducting suppression activities in hunting areas. Contact your local ranger station for current closure information. Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be numerous firefighting vehicles on the roadway. Please drive with caution, and be aware that smoke may cause limited visibility.

Closures: The Klamath National Forest has issued Closure Order No. 17-05-801 to close trails, roads, and lands on the Ukonom Ranger District as a result of Orleans Complex fires:

Closure: http://bit.ly/2xDQhof
Map: http://bit.ly/2wfNCBD

Closure Order No. 17-05-797 closes a portion of the Ukonom and Happy Camp Ranger Districts northeast of the Ukonom Fire

Closure: http://bit.ly/2wAbXVt
Map: http://bit.ly/2ggLi9N

Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR): A TFR is in effect over the fire area to provide a safe environment for firefighting aviation operations (http://bit.ly/2ws6uQq).

Burning Restrictions: The Six Rivers National Forest remains under fire restrictions to provide for public and resource safety. Details about these restrictions can be found on the forest website at https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd550653.pdf.

August 25, 2017 at 7:25 AM

The Orleans Complex has 19 fires for a total of 9,795. Thirteen fires have been contained. Six fires remain active: the Ukonom at 4,111 acres (52% contained); the Haypress at 4,013 (0% contained); the Burney at 1,334 (0% contained); the Forks at 243 acres (0% containment); the Frank at 27 acres (0% contained); and the Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained. Active fires are being fought using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

The Haypress, Ukonom, and Burney fires grew slightly over the past 24 hours. The south end of the Haypress was more active, and the Ukonom is moving slowly toward the Ukonom Creek and Lick Creek drainages. All fires are located in steep and rugged terrain that poses a risk to firefighters.

Tactical firing operations were successfully conducted by firefighters the last two nights to remove unburned fuels along Forest Road 15N17. The operation is intended to help confine the Haypress to areas where private property and natural and cultural resources are not threatened.

The NorCal Team 2 Incident Management Team has taken over management of the Orleans Complex.

August 23, 2017 at 7:21 AM

Planned Actions:  Keep the Haypress Fire confined within the Wilderness Boundary. Look for opportunities for tactical firing. Prepare indirect fireline for when the Haypress Fire comes out of the wilderness. Continue to construct indirect line and improve existing roads to strengthen containment lines for the Ukonom Fire, and patrol existing completed containment and confinement lines. Continued scouting for suppression opportunities including strategic firing to keep even with the main fire as it slowly spreads to the southeast. Reconnaissance continues on the Burney, Frank, and Hooligan fires. Resources will continue to focus on opening trails, roads and previous control lines from the Nikowitz fire for containment and confinement opportunities of the Forks Fire.

August 22, 2017 at 10:00 AM

The Orleans Complex has 19 fires for a total of 8,242 acres. Thirteen fires have been contained. Six fires remain active: the Ukonom at 3,948 acres (52% contained); the Haypress at 2,661 (0% contained); the Burney at 1,297 (0% contained); the Forks at 243 acres (0% containment); the Frank at 27 acres (0% contained); and the Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained. Active fires are being fought using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

The predominant fire activity in the complex is coming from the Haypress. To the north, the fire has extended beyond the Marble Mountain Wilderness and has moved along the southern portion of Forest Road 13N42. Crews are preparing to conduct tactical firing operations within the next few days to reduce fuels and limit the fire’s rate of spread if it comes out of Haypress drainage, to the west. Near Wooley Creek, fire is backing downhill south toward Fowler Cabin, which has been wrapped with protective material.

Yesterday, the Ukonom Fire slightly increased in size. The Burney, Forks and Frank Fires have had some interior burning, but little or no perimeter growth.

NorCal Team 2 will begin to shadow SoCal Team 3 and will take over management of the complex Thursday at 6:00 am.

August 21, 2017 at 8:04 AM

The Orleans Complex has 19 fires for a total of 8,096 acres. Thirteen fires have been contained. Six fires remain active: the Ukonom at 3,880 acres (52% contained); the Haypress at 2,586 (0% contained); the Burney at 1,294 (0% contained); the Forks at 243 acres (0% containment); the Frank at 27 acres (0% contained); and the Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained. Active fires are being fought using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

Personnel:754 Crews:21 Engines:25 Helicopters:8 Dozers:19 Water tenders:8 Mules:7

The Haypress is the most active in the complex. Although smoke limited visibility, a reconnaissance flight identified fire activity just north of the Marble Mountain Wilderness boundary along Forest Road 13N42; crews are working to keep it close to the road. The fire has crossed Haypress Creek in a small section. In Wooley Creek, to the south, fire is backing downhill toward Fowler Cabin.

A mule team packed into the Wooley Creek area, where they remained overnight. Today, a Wildland Fire Module will hike 5 miles into the camp to evaluate their fireline access and tactical options. They will stay in the wilderness for several days while they work to develop and implement a strategy to keep the fire from crossing Wooley Creek. If fire conditions allow, they will make their way into the Fowler Cabin area. The mule team will support their logistical needs with loads that include items such as water, MREs (meal, ready to eat) drip-torches, medical supplies, and other firefighting and site preparation equipment. For additional information on mule teams, please visit the Inciweb incident site at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/5430/38429/.

Over the past several days, the Ukonom, Forks, and Frank have had some interior burning, but no perimeter growth. The Burney has slightly increased in size, but growth has been slow and limited.

Heavy smoke impacts will continue in the region due to several active fires in the Klamath, Six Rivers, and Rogue-Siskiyou National Forests. Most of the smoke has been produced by fires on the Eclipse Complex and Salmon August Complex. Smoke is densest near the fires and south of the fires. The most affected communities are along the Klamath River, the Hoopa Valley, Sawyers Bar, the Scott Valley. Smoke is also affecting the Eureka and Weaverville areas. Information on the health effects of smoke and what you can do to reduce your smoke exposure can be found here https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/smoke.html.

August 19, 2017 at 10:31 AM

The Orleans Complex has 19 fires for a total of 7,023 acres. Thirteen fires have been contained. Six fires remain active; the Ukonom at 3,854 acres (52% contained); the Haypress at 1,560 (0% contained); the Burney at 1,273 (0% contained); the Forks at 243 acres (0% containment): the Frank at 27 acres (0% contained) and the Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained. Active fires are being fought using a combination of containment and confinement strategies.

The most active fire is the Haypress, which has crossed a segment of Forest Road 13N42. Crews are working to keep it close to the road. The fire is holding at Haypress Creek, to the west, and at Wooley Creek, to the south; both are providing natural barriers. Significant smoke in the area is limiting visibility and poses additional challenges when inserting firefighters and assessing tactical options. Helicopter operations were hampered by smoke over the complex. A specialized Wildland Fire Module (WFM) comprised of 14 firefighters will be inserted into the area when visibility and conditions allow.

WFMs specialize in fire intelligence gathering such as perimeter mapping, line placement, identification of critical resource values, control points, management action points and safety zones; structure protection triage, planning, and implementation actions. They also provide a unique skill of high operational self-sufficiency. WFMs have the capability to operate in any location with little to no need for additional supplies or support from local fire management or Incident Management Team’s. WFMs carry backcountry camping equipment and can sustain themselves for up to seven days at a time. On this incident, however, they will be supported by a Mule Team consisting of 7 pack mules from the Shasta-Trinity National Forest that are staged at the Wooley Creek Trailhead. The Mule Team will pack in supply loads to support WFMs, which may include water, MREs (meal, ready to eat) drip-torches, and other fire-fighting and site preparation equipment.

Heavy smoke impacts will continue in the region due to several active fires in the Klamath, Six Rivers, and Rogue-Siskiyou National Forests. Most of the smoke has been produced by fires on the Eclipse Complex and Salmon August Complex. Smoke is densest near the fires and south of the fires. Affected communities are along the Klamath River drainage from Seiad Valley downstream to Weitchpec, the Hoopa Valley, Sawyers Bar, and the Scott Valley.

August 18, 2017 at 7:10 AM

Representatives from the Six Rivers National Forest and Karuk Tribal Members along with the Orleans Complex Incident Management Team will be hosting a community meeting. Representative will be discussing the status of the Orleans Complex.

When: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 5:00 P.M.
Where: Karuk Department of National Resource Center
39051 Highway 96 Orleans, CA

August 17, 2017 at 9:23 AM

The complex includes the Ukonom at 3854 acres (52% contained), the Burney at 1123 acres (0% contained), Frank at 13 acres (0% contained), Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained), Haypress at 545 acres (0% contained), Zulu 1 through 7 that ranged from 0.1 acres to 18 acres, and the Forks at 246 acres (0% contained). Terrain in the fire area is steep, rugged and remote. Crews continue to use a confinement strategy focused on existing roads and fire lines to reduce the hazards to firefighters, and keep fires in remote areas of the National Forest to protect heritage, cultural and natural resources.

Fuel types include brush and timber. Heavy precipitation from last winter has weakened trees and created increased dead and down fuel loads. Most fires are burning in burn scars that occurred within the last 10-20 years. Fuel moistures remain high, how­­­­ever fire behavior remains active.

The Haypress fire continues to be the most active in the complex. Spot fires continue to grow north of Forest Road 13N42. Measures including tactical firing operations will be conducted when appropriate.

Smoke impacts will continue to be heavy in the region due to several active fires in the Klamath and Six Rivers National Forests. Smoke has settled into communities along the Klamath River drainage, from Seiad Valley downstream to Weitchpec. Additionally, northeasterly winds are carrying smoke further south to Willow Creek and into communities along the coast from Crescent City to Eureka. For up-to-date Air Quality Advisory Information, the public can call toll-free 1-866-BURN-DAY (1-866-287-6329), or visit the NCUAQMD website www.ncuaqmd.org . For additional information regarding this PSA, please contact: North Coast Air Quality Management District 707 L Street, Eureka, CA 95501, (707) 443-3093

The Ten Bear Trailhead leading to the Marble Mountain Wilderness is closed. Hikers wanting to access the wilderness should contact the Orleans District Office (530) 627-3291 or Orleans Complex Fire Information (619) 359-3415 for details on affected trails.

August 17, 2017 at 7:18 AM

The Orleans Complex is comprised of 19 fires and is currently 5819 acres with 35% contained. The complex includes the Ukonom at 3854 acres (52% contained), the Burney at 1123 acres (0% contained), Frank at 13 acres (0% contained), Hooligan at 0.1 acres (0% contained), Haypress at 532 acres (0% contained), Zulu 1 through 7 that ranged from 0.1 acres to 24 acres, and the Forks at 244 acres (0% contained). Terrain in the fire area is steep, rugged and remote. Crews continue to use a confinement strategy focused on existing roads and fire lines to reduce the hazards to firefighters, and keep fires in remote areas of the National Forest to protect heritage, cultural and natural resources.

The Haypress Fire remains the most active fire in the complex with growth of over 100 acres yesterday. The primary goal is to keep it confined within the wilderness boundary. Firefighters will continue to conduct suppression action by constructing indirect fireline. Firefighters continue to construct indirect line and improve existing roads to strengthen containment lines for the Ukonom Fire with consistent patrols around the confinement lines. Structure protection has been completed for the cabins, including the Fowler Cabin, at the junction of the Bridge Creek Trail and the Haypress Trail.

Smoke impacts continue to affect communities in the Klamath River drainage and Scott Valley due to several active fires in the region. Heavy smoke has drained into valleys overnight and is expected to remain through the day. Communities such as Etna, Seiad Valley, Happy Camp and Sawyers Bar will be the most affected due to proximity to fires. Areas down wind, such as Somes Bar and south along the Klamath River drainage to Hoopa and further, are expected to see moderate to heavy smoke impacts today.

August 13, 2017 at 10:06 AM

The Haypress fire, located in the Marble Mountain Wilderness near Wooley Creek, was the most active fire in the complex. Haypress grew to almost 131 acres. Several cabins in the wilderness are currently threatened, crews will be working on structure protection to save the historic buildings.

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The Orleans Complex is comprised of two zones, an East and West. The East Zone is being managed by a type 2 Incident Management Team, SoCal Team 3 led by Incident Commander Mike Wakoski. The West Zone is under a type 3 team led by Incident Commander Dave Markin. The Complex has a total of 19 fires and is 5423 acres, 14% contained.

The East Zone of the complex includes the Ukonom Fire at 3854 acres (52% contained), the Burney Fire at 1123 acres (0% contained), and the Frank Fire at 13 acres (0% contained), Hooligan at .1 acres (0% contained), Haypress at 131 acres (0% contained) and Zulu 1 through 8 that range from .1 acres to 24 acres. In the West Zone, the Forks Fire remains the largest at 243 acres (0% contained). Terrain in the fire area is steep, rugged and remote. Crews continue to use a confinement strategy focused on existing roads and fire lines to reduce the hazards to firefighters, and keep fires in remote areas of the National Forest to protect heritage, cultural and natural resources.

Increased smoke production from several fires in the northwest California region are impacting communities in the northern Klamath River drainage and Scott Valley. The communities surrounding Happy Camp, Yreka, Fort Jones, Etna and Callahan will continue to see heavy smoke impacts as westerly winds drift smoke eastward. Winds shifting to northwesterly this afternoon will transport smoke toward Mt. Shasta, increasing smoke impacts in this region. On the southern portion of the Klamath River drainage, including Hoopa and Willow Creek, hazy skies and moderate smoke conditions are expected to remain.

The Ten Bear Trailhead leading to the Marble Mountain Wilderness is closed. Hikers wanting to access the wilderness should contact the Orleans District Office at 530-627-3291 or Orleans Complex Fire Information for details on affected trails.

A Temporary Flight Restriction Area (TFR) has been set over the fire area to provide a safe environment for firefighting aviation operations.

A portion of the Happy Camp Ranger District, in the vicinity of the Ukonom Fire, is closed to public entry for the duration of the fire due to the risks associated with an active wildfire. The closure stretches from the east bank of the Klamath River east to the Independence Creek Road and includes Ukonom Creek. Please review Klamath National Forest, Emergency Closure order number 17-05-797 for complete details at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/5433/37176/.

Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be large amounts of fire traffic. Please drive with caution. Forest visitors need to be extremely careful when camping, hunting, and when cutting fire wood.

August 12, 2017 at 9:25 AM

Several crews and engines from the complex supported neighboring Ranger Districts with new small fires. Terrain in the fire area is steep, rugged and remote. Smokejumpers and hotshot crews will continue to construct handline in order to reach confinement and suppression objectives. The incident will continue to support the Forest with any new fire activity.

Hazy skies and moderate smoke impacts will remain in most communities in the region today. The exceptions are in Happy Camp and Seiad Valley where heavier smoke impacts will be seen. Although clearer air should filter in later today as up-canyon winds help to push out residual smoke in the Klamath River drainage and other valleys, hazy skies and moderate conditions will persist along with heavier impacts in the Happy Camp zone.

The Orleans Complex remains an estimated at 5274 acres with total containment at 14%. The East Zone of the complex includes the Ukonom Fire at 3854 acres (52% contained), the Burney Fire at 1123 acres (0% contained), and the Frank Fire at 13 acres (0% contained), Zulu 1 at 1 acres (100% contained), Zulu 2 at 0.1 acres (100% contained), Zulu 3 at 4 acres (100% contained), Zulu 4 at 4 acres (100% contained), Zulu 5 at 0.5 acres (100% contained), Zulu 6 at 18 acres (0% contained), Zulu 7 at 4 acres (100% contained), Alpha 1 at 2 acres (100% contained), Hooligan at .1 acres (0% contained).

The West Zone had minimal growth while the Forks Fire remains the largest at 244 acres (0% contained). Crews continue to use a confinement strategy focused on existing roads and fire lines to reduce the hazards to firefighters, and keep fires in remote areas of the National Forest to protect heritage, cultural and natural resources.

Total personnel: 627 Crews: 13 Engines: 10 Dozers: 8 Water Tenders: 9 Helicopters: 8

The Ten Bear Trailhead leading to the Marble Mountain Wilderness is now closed. Hikers wanting to access the wilderness should contact the Orleans District Office or Orleans Complex Fire Information for details on affected trails.

Light Southwesterly winds will drift smoke from fires in the Klamath and Six Rivers National Forests to the North and East. Communities in the Happy Camp region are expected to see periods of heavy smoke impacts. Otherwise, communities to the South in the Klamath River drainage and Scott Valley, such as Hoopa and Etna, should expect moderate air quality with hazy skies. Additionally, regional fires are expected to contribute to degraded air quality.

A portion of the Happy Camp Ranger District, in the vicinity of the Ukonom Fire, is closed to public entry for the duration of the fire due to the risks associated with an active wildfire. The closure stretches from the east bank of the Klamath River east to the Independence Creek Road and includes Ukonom Creek. Please review Klamath National Forest, Emergency Closure order number 17-05-797 for complete details at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/5433/37176/.

The Six Rivers National Forest remains under fire restrictions. Details about these restrictions can be found on the Forest website at www.fs.usda.gov/srnf. For more information, smoke forecasts, maps and photographs please visit the Orleans Complex Inciweb site at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5430/.

Motorists traveling on State Highway 96 are reminded that there will be large amounts of fire traffic. Please drive with caution. Forest visitors need to be extremely careful when camping, hunting, and when cutting fire wood. There is always the risk of starting a wildfire. For more information on how wildfires can be prevented, remember “One Less Spark, One Less Wildfire” and visit http://preventwildfireca.org/OneLessSpark/

President Harry S. Truman established the Six Rivers National Forest by Presidential proclamation on June 3, 1947. The new Forest’s initial 900,000 acres were carved from the western portions of the Klamath and Trinity National Forests and the southern portion of the Siskiyou National Forest.

Cooperators on the incident include representatives from the Karuk, Yurok and Hoopa Tribes, California Conservation Corps, Siskiyou County Sheriff Department, California Highway Patrol, and Caltrans.

August 9, 2017 at 7:40 AM

East Zone: Resources will continue to conduct suppression actions on new lightning fires, continue to construct indirect line and improve existing roads to strengthen containment lines for the Ukonom, continue mop up on spot fires across the Klamath River, and patrol existing completed containment and confinement lines. Continued scouting for suppression opportunities including strategic firing to keep even with the main fire as it slowly spreads to the southwest. Reconnaissance continues on the Burney and Frank fires.

West Zone: Resources will continue to conduct suppression action on the Dill Fire, and continue to focus on opening trails, roads and previous control lines from the Nikowitz fire for contain and confinement opportunities for the Forks Fire.

It takes many personnel to support a firefighting force as large as the one managing the Orleans Complex. An example of a support crew is the California Conservation Corps (CCCs) who provide assistance at fire camps throughout the state. Crew #3, which is a camp crew from Fortuna, California, includes 12 young adults and a crew supervisor. They are working at the Orleans Complex Incident Command Post. This is the first fire assignment for the crew, and they work long days beginning with a briefing at 4:45 am. Their daily duties include emptying trashcans, restocking ice chests with water and ice, clearing roadside brush, filling potholes, handing out bag lunches to firefighters, and keeping count of every meal eaten. They assist in many other ways around the camp and are always willing to acquire new skills. Crew #3 has learned how to use a variety of hand tools on this assignment, along with having the opportunity to interact on a professional level with 700 firefighters. This program is building leadership skills while helping fire camps run more smoothly. There is also a firefighting CCC crew out of Fortuna that was assigned to the Orleans Complex.

Today Crew #3 learned about the Incident Management System and how all the different sections work by going to an incident briefing. Operations, Communications, Fire Information, Planning, Finance, Safety, Air Operations and the Incident Commander gave talks about their sections.

August 6, 2017 at 8:52 PM

Effective immediately, State Highway 96 is being closed near mile marker 20.55 (just north of Dillon Creek Campground) due to a spot fire from the Ukonom Fire that is burning north of the river and the highway.  The spot fire is about 15 acres in size and firefighters are working to suppress it with help from helicopters dropping water and retardant. The highway will be closed until further notice.

CA IMT 2 (Coots) in command of the Ukonom, Burney and Frank Fire. Six Rivers NF will retain control of the remaining fires with a Type 3 IC. Ukonom fire is 3,200 acres and 19% contained with a full suppression strategy. The Burney Fire is 970 acres, the Forks Fire is 231 acres. All other fires are less than 15 acres. Threat to Ukonom Lookout. Smoke is impacting nearby communities.

August 5, 2017 at 11:21 AM

Firefighters continue to make good progress on the Orleans Complex, in spite of extremely hot temperatures. The total acreage burned on the entire complex to date is approximately 3,160 acres. The Ukonom Fire has burned about 2,400 acres. The fire continues to back down to Ukonom Creek and the Klamath River on the west, north and east. Containment on the complex is currently only at 5 percent due to the extremely steep terrain, numerous snags, which poses a high risk to firefighters, and the heavy fuels the fire is consuming. Infrared aircraft was able to fly on Thursday night to provide updated acreage of the fires’ perimeters.

Crews are using existing roads, ridges and strategic firing to establish control lines on the southern perimeter of the fire. The Burney Fire has been burning more actively recently and is approximately 513 acres. The Frank Fire is 13 acres. The Ukonom, Burney and Frank fires make up the East Zone of the complex, which is being managed by NorCal Team 1 under Incident Commander Curtis Coots.

The West Zone of the complex consists of the Dillon and Elk Fires which both are 0.1 acres with 100% containment. The Chimney Fire is 0.5 acres, and the Little Fire is 3 acres. The Forks Fire, which burned more actively yesterday is approximately 230 acres. These fires are 0% contained. Incident Commander Duane Franklin is managing these fires under a Type 3 organization.

Cooperators on the incident include the Karuk and Yurok Tribes, Klamath NF and Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Several Forest Service roads in the vicinity of the fire are closed to protect the public from the risks associated with an active wildfire, including Forest Road No. 15N17Y (Independence Creek Road), from its intersection south with Forest Road No. 15N10 (Titus Ridge Road). The closure includes Ukonom Creek.

When wildfires occur, air resource advisors assist fire managers by providing timely smoke impact and forecast information based on best-available science. The Forest Service coordinates with multiple agencies to address public health risks related to smoke exposure, risks to transportation safety, and smoke exposure to personnel in fire camps. The team is coordinating with the California Air Resource Board and Siskiyou County Air Pollution Control District to place smoke monitors in areas most likely to be impacted by the Orleans Complex. Currently there are monitors in Orleans, Weitchpec, Hoopa, Sawyers Bar and Willow Creek.

The measurements these smoke monitors gather are the foundation for informing the public and predicting impacts to firefighter and public health. This data is used to analyze and communicate smoke impacts to give people the information they need to minimize their exposure to smoke. An air resource advisor is assigned to the complex to assist with monitoring, modeling and reporting smoke conditions. Smoke monitors provide continuous data that can be used to prepare a daily smoke forecast outlook for surrounding communities. Smoke from other large fires in Northern California and Southern Oregon is also affecting air quality in Siskiyou and Humboldt Counties.

Drivers are asked to use caution and slow down when travelling between Somes Bar and Happy Camp on Highway 96 due to heavy fire traffic. There are one way traffic controls in place between Persidio Bar and Dillon Creek.

August 4, 2017 at 7:58 PM

State Hwy 96 has been re-opened between Carter Creek & Dillon Creek. Motorists should use caution & watch for rocks on the road. Drive safe!

August 4, 2017 at 6:11 PM

A stretch of State Highway 96 will be temporarily closed north of Orleans effective at 5 p.m. Friday, August 4 due to rockfall on the road from the Ukonom Fire. The closure will be between Carter Creek on the south and Dillon Creek on the north.

Rocks dislodged by the fire are rolling down on to the road, creating a hazardous situation for motorists. Fire managers are working to remove the rocks as quickly as possible but the closure may be for several hours.

August 3, 2017 at 8:15 PM

In the timber, fire behavior has been generally low with minimal activity in the form of backing, creeping and flanking. Down logs have been the primary carrier for surface fire spread. When slope, aspect and wind align, there are some short independent fire runs through heavy concentrations of surface fuels and occasional single tree torching in smaller trees. Spotting has mainly occurred from roll-out, and when heavy pockets of fuel actively burn.

August 3, 2017 at 10:03 AM

In spite of extremely hot temperatures, firefighters continue to make good progress on the Orleans Complex. The total acreage burned on the entire complex to date is about 1627 acres. The Ukonom Fire has burned about 1300 acres, and it continues to back down to Ukonom Creek and the Klamath River on the west, north and east. Containment on the complex remains at 0 percent due to the steep terrain and the risk it poses to firefighters, as well as the heavy fuels the fire is burning in.

Crews are using existing roads, ridges and strategic firing to establish control lines on the southern perimeter of the fire. The Burney Fire has been burning more actively recently, and is about 110 acres. The Franks Fire is about 13 acres. These three fires make up the east zone of the complex, which is being managed by NorCal Team 1 under Incident Commander Curtis Coots.

The west zone of the complex consists of the Dillon and Elk Fires which are each about 0.1 acres and 100% contained; the Chimney, which is about 0.5 acres; the Little which is about 3 acres; and the Forks, which burned more actively yesterday and is about 200 acres in size. These fires are 0% contained. Duane Franklin is managing these fires under a Type 3 organization.

The Orleans Complex had the honor of hosting Christophe Frerson, who works for the Civil Security, Interministry Headquarters South, in Marseille, South France. Christophe, who is not only a Fire Fighter Commander (which is similar to a Regional Assistant Fire Director here), also works in law enforcement, anti-terrorism and air traffic control. He was here to observe the differences and similarities between the two countries in the world of fire. He said there were more similarities then differences. For instance, our Hotshot crews (Type 1 hand crew) are called Fire Intervention Sections in France, which are like military forces. He stated the mapping system and the organization in general, is very similar, but have different names. They do not have the Incident Command System (ICS), which is used on any significant incident in the U.S., but he will take information about ICS back to his country and try to implement a similar organization. Most fires in South France last only 12 hours because they go “full strike force”, as he described it, with everything they have to suppress wildfires quickly. Ninety percent of fires are human caused, with 45% of those being arson, 30% undetermined and 3% are caused by children. He told us he gathered a lot of new helpful information that he will take back with him and he really enjoyed his visit, sleeping in his tent, eating fire camp food, and especially meeting all the firefighters.

An air resource advisor is assigned to the complex to assist with monitoring, modeling and reporting smoke conditions. Monitors have been placed in strategic locations to provide continuous data that can be used to prepare a daily smoke forecast outlook for surrounding communities. Smoke from other large fires in northern California and southern Oregon is also affecting air quality in Siskiyou and Humboldt Counties.

August 2, 2017 at 9:12 PM

NorCal Team 1 (Coots) is managing the east zone of the complex, the Ukonom, Burney and Franks fires. The Six Rivers NF will retain command of the west zone including the Chimney, Dillon, Forks, Little and Elk Fires.

Ukonom fire will continue to spread to the southwest burning downslopes of Northern Ukonom Mtn. Lookout in heavy timber fuels and brush on very steep terrain. The fire will continue to downhill consuming heavy fuels and making short uphill runs in the Northern portion of the fire. Night firing operations in Division A will bring the main fire to the indirect dozer line. Inversions will cause smoky conditions in the Klamath River drainage area, with moderate activity above inversion. Fires above the inversion will continue to spread. Predicted thunderstorms could cause gusty erratic winds. Fire behavior will moderate under the inversion layer with more active burning above the inversion. As the inversion lifts fire activity will increase during the day. The Ukonom fire will continue to burn downhill to the north, east and west. The fire will continue to spread to the southeast burning towards Ukonom Mtn. Lookout, in heavy timber fuels and brush on very steep terrain. Division A will bring the fire to the indirect dozer line.

August 1, 2017 at 8:40 AM

The Northern California 1 Incident Management Team in command of the Orleans Complex will be holding a public meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 1 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources office on State Highway 96 in Orleans. Agency personnel and team members will make short presentations and answer questions regarding the status of the Ukonom Fire and the other six fires that make up the Orleans Complex.

Fire behavior on the Ukonom Fire in the morning under the inversion is minimal with slow backing and slow forward rate of spread in available fuels until the smoke lifts out. Most of the fire activity is occurring in the northern section of the fire and was predominantly heavy fuels burning out. Fire growth has been perpetuated by rolling materials on steep slopes igniting fuels and jackpots of heavy fuel below, spotting into snags and making short runs through the brush.

Increased fire activity with lower relative humidity and higher temperatures. Fire behavior will moderate under the inversion layer with more active burning above the inversion. As the inversion lifts, fire activity will increase during the day. The Ukonom Fire will continue to burn downhill to the north, east and west. The fire will continue to spread to the southeast burning towards Ukonom Mountain Lookout in heavy timber fuels and brush on very steep terrain. The fire will continue to back downhill consuming heavy fuels and making short, uphill runs in the northern portion of the fire. This activity could pose threats to private parcels of land along the Highway 96 corridor. Predominant winds may be shifting, which would provide crews opportunities to complete firing missions. Inversions will cause smoky conditions in the Klamath River drainage, with moderate activity above the inversion. Fires above the inversions will continue to spread.

July 31, 2017 at 6:00 PM

The Northern California 1 Incident Management Team in command of the Orleans Complex will be holding a public meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 1 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources office on State Highway 96 in Orleans. Agency personnel and team members will make short presentations and answer questions regarding the status of the Ukonom Fire and the other six fires that make up the Orleans Complex.

The Orleans Complex on the Orleans/Ukonom Ranger District is currently 1,222 acres as of Monday morning. The Complex currently includes seven lightning-caused fires on the Six Rivers National Forest and in the Siskiyou Wilderness.

Suppression of the Ukonom Fire in the East Zone is being managed by Northern California Incident Management Team 1 under Type II Incident Commander Curtis Coots. Fires in the West Zone are managed by Type III IC James Courtright. These fires include the Chimney, Dillon, Forks and Little fires. A combination of suppression and confinement strategies are being used for the incident. Containment is currently at 0%.

There are 565 personnel assigned to the Complex, including 13 crews, 20 engines, 10 dozers, 9 water tenders and 9 helicopters.

Cooperators on the incident include the Karuk and Yurok Tribes, Klamath National Forest, Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Land Management.

There will be a public meeting at 6 p.m. in Karuk Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources office in Orleans at 6 p.m. on Tuesday to provide the local community with more information about the fire.

The forest’s top priority on the East Zone of the Orleans Complex is the Ukonom Fire burning near Ukonom Mountain. This fire is estimated at approximately 1,082 acres based on an infrared flight Sunday night.

Weather conditions will cause smoke to concentrate in the valley floors of the Klamath River Drainage and could impact local communities. Conditions are expected to be warmer and drier today.

The first priority for all fires that are part of the Orleans Complex is to provide for firefighter and public safety, along with protecting cultural sites and natural resources.

July 30, 2017 at 9:20 AM

A photo during the initial attack stage of the Ukonom Fire on July 26. James Courtright/U.S. Forest Service

The Orleans Complex includes seven fires burning in Siskiyou County on the Orleans/Yukonom Ranger District of the Six Rivers National Forest. Suppression of the fires in the east zone east of the Klamath River is being managed by NorCal Team 1 under the leadership of IC Curtis Coots. The largest fire, named the Ukonom, is burning on Ukonom Mountain. The fires in the west zone, which are burning in the Siskiyou Wilderness west of the Klamath River, are being managed by IC James Courtright.

Moderate fire behavior with backing and flanking observed overnight. Threat to Ukonom Lookout, communications infrastrucure, significant cultural and heritage sites for the Karuk Tribe, smoke impact on local residences and spotted owl habitat.

Ukonom Fire will continue to spread to the east towards Ukonom Mountain Lookout. This area has heavy timber fuels on very steep terrain. Smoke will cause an inversion in the Klamath River drainage, with more active burning above the inversion. The Forks Fire will continue to spread above the inversion level.