Pew Research: Obama Tops Public’s List of Best President in Their Lifetime, Followed by Clinton, Reagan

WASHINGTON, D.C. July 11, 2018 – When asked which president has done the best job in their lifetimes, more Americans name Barack Obama than any other president, according to a new national survey by Pew Research Center. More than four-in-ten (44%) say Obama is the best or second best president of their lifetimes, compared with about a third who mention Bill Clinton (33%) or Ronald Reagan (32%).

Not yet halfway through his term, 19% say Donald Trump has done the best or second best job of any president of their lifetimes. That is comparable with the share who viewed Obama as one of the best presidents in 2011 (20%).

The survey asks people in an open-ended format which president has done the best job in their lifetimes. The analysis is based on their first and second choices.

People’s views of the best president of their lifetimes are partly tied to their ages. Millennials, who are currently ages 22 to 37, are far more likely than older generations to name Obama as one of the best presidents in their lifetimes: About six-in-ten Millennials (62%) view Obama as one of the top two, with nearly half, 46%, naming him the best president.

Older generations are much more likely than Millennials to name Reagan as one of the best presidents. Reagan was president before most Millennials were born. Gen Xers (ages 38 to 53) are divided in their assessments: 45% of Gen Xers name Reagan, while nearly as many mention Obama (41%) or Clinton (39%). Reagan is the top choice among Boomers (ages 54 to 72) and Silents (ages 73 to 90); about four-in-ten in the two older generations name Reagan (42% of Boomers, 38% of Silents). But within both generations, there are a range of opinions, with Obama, Kennedy, Clinton and Trump all receiving mentions from 15% or more Boomers and Silents.

As was the case in 2011, many people, including many in the president’s own party, do not name the current president as the best in their lifetimes. Currently, 44% name Obama as their first or second choice for having done the best job of any president of their lifetimes, while 33% name Clinton, 32% Reagan and 19% Trump. In 2011, 49% said Clinton had been one of the top two presidents, compared with 34% who cited Reagan and 20% who mentioned Obama.

The share naming Obama has more than doubled since 2011 (from 20% to 44%), while the share mentioning Clinton has declined, from 49% to 33%. However, the ratings for other presidents have not changed much since 2011: 32% cite Reagan (34% in 2011); 14% name George W. Bush (15% then); and 12% name Kennedy (15% then).

A sizable majority of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents say Barack Obama (71%) is the best (51%) or second best (20%) president in their lifetimes. About half of Democrats name Clinton (49%). Another 14% of Democrats name Kennedy as one of their top two, 12% name Reagan and 10% mention George W. Bush. In 2011, Clinton was named most often as the best or second best president by 69% of Democrats, while 36% named Obama.

A majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents say Reagan (57%) ranks in the top two presidents in their lifetimes. Another 40% of Republicans name Trump, while 20% name George W. Bush, 16% name George H.W. Bush and 15% mention Clinton.

Republicans’ choices for the best president also have changed since 2011, though the share pointing to Reagan has not changed since then (57%).

The survey was conducted June 5-12 among 2,002 adults. The margin of sampling error is plus or minus 2.6 percentage points for results based on the full sample.

Read the report: http://www.people-press.org/2018/07/11/obama-tops-publics-list-of-best-president-in-their-lifetime-followed-by-clinton-reagan

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. It does not take policy positions. The Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. Subscribe to our daily and weekly email newsletters or follow us on our Fact Tank blog.