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November 22, 2017 – American voters say 63 – 26 percent they hope to avoid discussing politics when visiting with family or friends this Thanksgiving, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released today.

Voters 18 to 34 years old say 72 – 22 percent that they don’t want a side dish of politics with their turkey, the independent Quinnipiac University Poll finds. Men want to avoid politics 58 – 30 percent and women say can the controversy 67 – 22 percent.

The way people talk about politics is contributing to violence in the U.S., American voters say 69 – 27 percent.

American voters disapprove 52 – 42 percent of some National Football League players choosing to kneel during the National Anthem. Men disapprove 54 – 39 percent while women disapprove by a narrow 49 – 44 percent.

But voters say 67 – 31 percent that NFL players have the right to protest by taking a knee. There is virtually no gender gap, but a wide partisan gap: Supporting players’ rights are Democrats 88 – 11 percent and independent voters 69 – 29 percent. Republican voters say 58 – 39 percent that players do not have the right to protest.

Sandwiched in with the turkey, 44 percent of American voters, including 50 percent of men and 39 percent of women, plan to watch football this Thanksgiving.

Because of the NFL player protests, 27 percent of voters are watching less football these days, while 66 percent say they are watching about the same amount.

“Fed up with the daily dose of political heartburn and starving for a little holiday harmony, American voters say feed me turkey not politics,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll. “The holiday season begins with a conflict-weary public.

“Most voters don’t approve of NFL players taking a knee in protest, but two-thirds say players have a right to protest and 27 percent of voters/viewers are exercising their right to turn off the game.”

Only 17 percent of American voters say they are less likely to watch football because of reports of severe brain damage among NFL players.

There is a wide gender gap as voters say 50 – 45 percent that if they had children they still would let them play full contact football. Men say 60 – 35 percent they would let their children play. Women say no 53 – 41 percent.

Feeling Thankful About the Economy

A total of 74 percent of American voters describe their personal financial situation as “excellent” or “good,” while 25 percent say “not so good” or “poor.” President Donald Trump’s policies are helping their personal finances, 21 percent of voters say, as 23 percent say these policies are hurting them and 54 percent say Trump policies are not making much difference.

A total of 58 percent of voters say the nation’s economy is “excellent” or “good,” while 41 percent say the U.S. economy is “not so good” or “poor.”

Former President Barack Obama is more responsible for the state of the nation’s economy, 43 percent of voters say, while 41 percent say President Trump is more responsible.

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The state of the stock market is “excellent” or “good,” 72 percent of voters say, while 14 percent say “not so good” or “poor.” Trump is more responsible for the state of the stock market, 50 percent of voters say, as 28 percent say Obama is more responsible.

A total of 66 percent of American voters say the nation’s job market is “excellent” or “good,” while 31 percent say “not so good” or “poor.” Trump is more responsible for the state of the job market, 45 percent say, while 41 percent say Obama is more responsible.

Only 44 percent of voters say the state of wages in the U.S. is “excellent” or “good,” while 53 percent say wages are “not so good” or “poor.” Trump and Obama share responsibility for the state of wages, as 38 percent point to Obama and 36 percent say Trump is more responsible.

From November 15 – 20, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,415 voters nationwide with a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percentage points, including the design effect. Live interviewers call landlines and cell phones.

The Quinnipiac University Poll, directed by Douglas Schwartz, Ph.D., conducts nationwide public opinion surveys, and statewide polls in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Ohio, Virginia, Iowa and Colorado as a public service and for research.