National Preparedness Level: 1 (On a scale from 1 to 5)

Southern California PL: 1 (On a scale from 1 to 5)

Northern California PL: 1 (On a scale from 1 to 5)

Current National Situation:

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Initial attack was light last with 250 new fires. 5 new large fires reported and 3 large fires contained.

This week

Fires: 250
Acres: 2,915

Year to date

Fires: 65,575
Acres: 5,446,520

10-yr average

Fires: 72,020
Acres: 7,004,259
(2006 – 2015 as of today)

Regional Fires

Incident NameStateLead AgencySize (acres)Percent ContainedEstimate of ContainmentPersonnelStructures Destroyed
Emerald, Lake TahoeCACAL FIRE AEU176100%October 16, 2016120

California Fires

Incident NameStateLead AgencySize (acres)Percent ContainedEstimate of ContainmentPersonnelStructures Destroyed
Soup Complex, Modoc National ForestCAMDF2,64762%October 31, 2016300

Out of State Fires

Incident NameStateLead AgencySize (acres)Percent ContainedEstimate of ContainmentPersonnelStructures Destroyed
Little Valley, Carson CityNVTMF2,291100%October 19, 201635839

Large Incident: A wildfire of 100 acres or more occurring in timber, or a wildfire of 300 acres or more occurring in grass/sage.
Wildland Fire: Any nonstructure fire, other than prescribed fire, that occurs in the wildland.
Wildland Fire – IMT1: Wildland fire; Type 1 Incident Management Team Assigned.
Wildland Fire – IMT2: Wildland fire; Type 2 Incident Management Team Assigned.
Wildland Fire – Other: Wildland fire; Other Incident Management Team Assigned besides a Type 1 or Type 2 team (e.g. Type 3).
Wildland Fire Use (WFU) Fire – A naturally ignited wildland fire that is managed to accomplish specific prestated resource management objectives in predefined geographic areas outlined in Fire Management Plans.
Map information provided courtesy of the UDSA Remote Sensing Application Center using data provided by the National Interagency Fire Center. The data is subject to change.

Weather Outlook:
A dry, warm, Westerly flow will continue across the Southern half of the nation Friday while the Northern tier of the country remains under a cold Northwesterly flow. A cold front will develop over East Texas Saturday and move into the Southeast on New Year’s Day spreading showers and storms into drought affected areas. Meanwhile, another strong system will move into the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies from the Gulf of Alaska further building upon the mountain snowpack. By Monday, mountain locations across Northern California and the Great Basin will begin to see accumulations as the system moves south in response to another round of Arctic air diving south into the Northern Rockies and Great Plains Monday night and Tuesday. By Wednesday, most of the CONUS except for coastal areas and South Texas will be under the influence of the blustery airmass. Gusty winds across the Eastern half of the country could create some wind chill issues, especially across the Ohio River Valley Thursday.