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Lawsuit Launched to Protect Ocelots from Controversial U.S. Wildlife-killing Agency

The Center for Biological Diversity and the Animal Welfare Institute today filed a notice of intent to sue the US Department of Agriculture to ensure that endangered ocelots aren’t inadvertently killed as part of its long-running program to kill coyotes, bears, bobcats and other wildlife in Arizona and Texas. The USDA’s Wildlife Services program kills tens of thousands of animals in the two states every year using traps, snares and poisons.

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Climate damage threatens world heritage sites

A world that faces the loss of the Statue of Liberty, where the ancient Italian city of Venice has been overwhelmed by flooding and a Ugandan forest that shelters mountain gorillas is at risk is all too real a possibility, says a new report.

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Grand Canyon Cattalo Status Obscured by Science Shell Game

The National Park Service is juggling the fate of a herd of hybridized bison marooned on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, according to correspondence released today by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). The agency has withdrawn a controversial report claiming these “cattalos” are wildlife “native” to Grand Canyon, a classification which would prevent their wholesale removal – an action supported by conservationists and the park’s own staff.

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Migratory fish species suffering severe population loss

In the past three decades global catches of sturgeons and paddlefishes have dropped by over 99 per cent, documenting severe population losses, according to a new WWF report.

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'Canaries' of the ocean highlight threat to world's ecosystems

Fifty-nine finfish species have 'disappeared' from fishermen's catches in the world's most species rich and vulnerable marine region, new research has shown.

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Will more snow over Antarctica offset rising seas? Don’t count on it

Many factors related to warming will conspire to raise the planet’s oceans over coming decades — thermal expansion of the world’s oceans, melting of snow and ice worldwide, and the collapse of massive ice sheets.

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No Junk-Food Diet: Even in Cities, Bees Find Flowers and Avoid Processed Sugars

New research from North Carolina State University finds that bees in urban areas stick to a flower-nectar diet, steering clear of processed sugars found in soda and other junk food.

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Vaquita Population Plummets to Just 60 Individuals

Scientists announced today that fewer than 60 vaquita porpoises likely remain on Earth, down from 245 in 2008. The vaquita is the world’s smallest and most endangered porpoise, found only in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California. Without permanent and fully enforced protections, the species could be effectively extinct within six years.

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Groups Protest Oregon Timber Plan Riddled With Loopholes

Today, Earthjustice and the Western Environmental Law Center, on behalf of 22 conservation and fishing groups, filed a formal protest with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) objecting to its proposed management plans for western Oregon. The BLM plan eliminates protections for streamside forests, increases clearcutting, and removes 2.6 million acres of these federally managed public forests from the 1994 Northwest Forest Plan.

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Wildfires to increase in Alaska with future climate change

Climate change is melting glaciers, reducing sea-ice cover and increasing wildlife activity - with some of the most dramatic impacts occurring in the northern high latitudes.

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Goodwill and Dell, Inc. Exposed as Exporters of US Public's Toxic Electronic Waste to Developing Countries

The international toxic trade watchdog organization, Basel Action Network (BAN), released a new report today following a two-year study that involved placing electronic GPS tracking devices into old hazardous electronic equipment such as printers, and computer monitors, and then watching where they travelled across the globe.

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Oil majors told to adapt or die

At best, big oil companies such as ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron and BP face a period of gentle decline, but will ultimately survive.

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Why Vultures Matter, and What We Lose if They're Gone

Vultures. Cartoon characters in parched deserts often wish them to disappear, since circling vultures are a stereotypical harbinger of death. But, joking aside, vultures in some parts of the world are in danger of disappearing. And according to a new report from University of Utah biologists, such a loss would have serious consequences for ecosystems and human populations alike.

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Floods and coastal erosion may expose contents of UK landfills, study finds

The contents of historic coastal landfill sites could pose a significant environmental threat if they erode, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

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Widespread water and soil contamination in North Dakota linked to fracking spills

Accidental wastewater spills from unconventional oil production in North Dakota have caused widespread water and soil contamination, a new Duke University study finds.

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Coal-Tar Based Sealcoats on Driveways, Parking Lots Far More Toxic Than Suspected

The pavement sealcoat products used widely around the nation on thousands of asphalt driveways and parking lots are significantly more toxic and mutagenic than previously suspected, according to a new paper published this week by researchers from Oregon State University.

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Court Settlement Provides Hope for Mexican Gray Wolves

A coalition of wolf conservation groups, environmental organizations and a retired federal wolf biologist today announced a court settlement requiring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service) to prepare a long-delayed recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves by November 2017.

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Large wildlife important for carbon storage in tropical forests

Many tropical forest trees depend on large fruit-eating animals such as elephants, tapirs, monkeys and hornbills for dispersing their sizeable seeds. Declines of these large mammals and birds due to hunting and forest disturbance, and consequent declines of tree species that they disperse, constitute a global conservation problem. Now, an international consortium of researchers predicts that such losses can cause substantial changes in the potential for tropical forests across the globe to store carbon, and thereby alter their ability to regulate our world's climate.

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Study: Even a little air pollution may have long-term health effects on developing fetus

Even small amounts of air pollution appear to raise the risk of a condition in pregnant women linked to premature births and lifelong neurological and respiratory disorders in their children, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

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Widespread loss of ocean oxygen to become noticeable in 2030s

A drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study.

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Rainforest study shows biodiversity loss worse than anticipated

The loss of plant and animal species around the world due to human activities could have been significantly underestimated due to a commonly used scientific method, according to a new study.

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Current measurement methods may be vastly underestimating the amount of plastic in the oceans

Plastics are all around us. They are found in containers and packing materials, children’s toys, medical devices and electronics.

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Grassroots tactics could improve global environmental policies

Much of the world may cringe as lemurs are hunted and killed or when entire forests are burnt and harvested for charcoal. However, if local residents don't perceive the actions as crimes or they believe there's a low risk of getting caught, then poaching and deforestation will continue.

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Goldman Environmental Prize Honors Six Heroes of the Environment

The Goldman Environmental Foundation today announced the six recipients of the 2016 Goldman Environmental Prize, the world’s largest award for grassroots environmental activists. Awarded annually to environmental heroes from each of the world’s six inhabited continental regions, the Goldman Prize recognizes fearless grassroots activists for significant achievements in protecting the environment and their communities.

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El Niño’s Warm Water Devastates Coral Reefs in Pacific Ocean

A team of marine scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Victoria have returned from nearly a month of scuba diving on coral reefs in the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. What they saw will haunt them for a long time.

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Combined effects of copper, climate change can be deadly for amphibians, research finds

Researchers at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory warn that the extinction to two amphibian species--the southern toad and the southern leopard frog--may be hastened by the combined effects of climate change and copper-contaminated wetlands.

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Will we soon see another wave of bird extinctions in the Americas?

In the shady recesses of unassuming forest patches in eastern Brazil, bird species are taking their final bows on the global evolutionary stage, and winking out.

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USGS: Ecosystem Restoration Projects Generate Jobs and Business Activity in Local, Regional, and National Economies

From restoring the sagebrush sea to rejuvenating watersheds and landscapes after fires, ecosystem restoration can bear substantial economic fruit for local, state and national economies, according to a USGS study published today.

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Number of National Parks Ending Bottled Water Sales Has Plateaued as Industry Pushes Back

National parks that have banned sales of plastic water bottles have seen significant cost savings and reductions in their waste streams but only 5% of parks have ended these sales – a number which has remained flat since 2014, according to documents posted today by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). In addition, a number of major parks which have studied the option are still holding back despite sizeable potential fiscal and environmental benefits. Disposable plastic water bottles represent the biggest source of trash in parks. Ending bottle sales is a “green” practice the National Park Service (NPS) authorized in 2011, after surmounting opposition from Coca-Cola, maker of the top-selling brand of bottled water.

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