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Germany and UK top "Dirty 30" pollution league

It's not the sort of league table that anyone is proud of leading, but a new report on the European Union's power sector lists the EU's 30 most polluting energy plants – all powered by coal.

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Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought, study shows

The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

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Sea level rise in western tropical Pacific will continue to rise as humans alter the climate

A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.

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Study led by indigenous people uncovers grizzly bear 'highway'

A novel, First Nations-led research collaboration has revealed a previously undocumented grizzly bear aggregation in coastal British ColumbiA, one of the most southerly aggregations of salmon-feeding grizzlies in North America. Using non-invasive DNA analysis, the authors describe a grizzly bear "highway," identifying nearly 60 individual bears, many who travelled hundreds of miles from surrounding areas to feed on autumn-spawning salmon in the Koeye River. The research was guided by the customary law and cultural practices of the Heiltsuk First Nation and recently published in the journal Ecology and Society.

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China and US boost search for carbon capture and storage solution

For years, the energy companies have been telling us not to worry. Yes, mounting carbon emissions threaten to heat up the world – but technology, particularly carbon capture and storage (CCS), will come to the rescue.

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Panthera Celebrates Efforts Undertaken to Protect Wild Sumatran Tigers

On July 16th, 2014, Panthera, the world's leading wild cat conservation organization, at their annual Tigers Forever meeting, recognized notable successes from numerous partners across tiger range in the fight to save wild tigers. Long-term conservation efforts in Indonesia to protect the endangered Sumatran tiger were celebrated, specifically those undertaken by the Artha Graha Peduli Foundation-Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation, the Ministry of Forestry, Ministry of Environment, the provincial government of Lampung, and the National Council on Climate Change.

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Wetlands Are Just Ducky: Duck Migration Study Reveals Importance of Conserving Wetlands

During the 2011 and 2012 migration seasons, University of Missouri researchers monitored mallard ducks with new remote satellite tracking technology, marking the first time ducks have been tracked closely during the entirety of their migration from Canada to the American Midwest and back. The research revealed that mallards use public and private wetland conservation areas extensively as they travel hundreds of miles across the continent. Dylan Kesler, an assistant professor of fisheries and wildlife in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at MU, says these findings illustrate the importance of maintaining protected wetland areas.

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Europe faces deadly cost for climate inaction

Inaction over climate change costs lives. And in the case of European inaction, it is estimated that this could one day cost 200,000 lives a year.

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Two new atlases reveal climate and weather impacts

For people who find it hard to believe the Earth really is warming, new visual evidence will soon be available – two atlases, one showing graphically the retreat of Arctic ice, the other the human and economic price exacted by extreme weather.

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Arctic warming upsets birds’ breeding calendar

Arctic migrants are nesting up to seven days earlier as the world warms. The sandpiper makes a beeline for the Alaskan shores, to join the phalarope on the beach and the songbirds in the woods − and all because the winter snows are melting earlier.

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Who is responsible for climate change?

Calculating the cumulative cost of carbon dioxide emissions gives new insights into the question of who is responsible for climate change.

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Quick fixes won't solve CO2 danger

Once again, US scientists have come to the same conclusion: there really is no alternative. The only way to contain climate change and limit global warming, they say, is to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

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From despair to repair: Dramatic decline of Caribbean corals can be reversed

With only about one-sixth of the original coral cover left, most Caribbean coral reefs may disappear in the next 20 years, primarily due to the loss of grazers in the region, according to the latest report by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

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A Case Study of Manta Rays and Lagoons

Douglas McCauley, a new assistant professor in UC Santa Barbara's Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, does fieldwork in one of the most isolated places in the world — Palmyra Atoll. About halfway between Hawaii and American Samoa, this complex of small islands and inlets in the central Pacific is surrounded by more than 15,000 acres of coral reefs and encircles three lagoons.

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Oil palm plantations threaten water quality, Stanford scientists say

If you've gone grocery shopping lately, you've probably bought palm oil.

Found in thousands of products, from peanut butter and packaged bread to shampoo and shaving cream, palm oil is a booming multibillion-dollar industry. While it isn't always clearly labeled in supermarket staples, the unintended consequences of producing this ubiquitous ingredient have been widely publicized.

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Deforestation in Indonesia highest in world, alleges study

A study in the journal Nature Climate Change alleges that the rate of deforestation in Indonesia is now the highest in the world. The study claims Indonesia lost 840,000 hectares of forest in 2012 compared to 460,000 hectares in Brazil.

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Study Finds Emperor Penguin in Peril

An international team of scientists studying Emperor penguin populations across Antarctica finds the iconic animals in danger of dramatic declines by the end of the century due to climate change. Their study, published today in Nature Climate Change, finds the Emperor penguin "fully deserving of endangered status due to climate change."

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New tests find bee-killing pesticides in 51% of "bee-friendly" plants from garden centers across U.S. and Canada

Many "bee-friendly" home garden plants sold at Home Depot (NYSE: HD), Lowe's (NYSE: LOW) and Walmart (NYSE: WMT) have been pre-treated with pesticides shown to harm and kill bees, according to a study released today by Friends of the Earth and allies.

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Hot cities: Climate change may lead to air stagnation, Stanford scientists say

Air quality for countries around the world could worsen in the 21st century as the occurrence of atmospheric stagnation events – in which still air lingers over a region – increases due to climate-change-related shifts in global wind and rainfall patterns, according to new research by scientists at Stanford University.

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New Report: Electric Cars Are Putting the Brakes on Pollution

More than 220,000 electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles are on America's roads today, delivering real benefits for our health and our environment, according to a new report released today by Environment America Research and Policy Center. In just the last two years, annual sales of electric vehicles have increased by 500 percent.

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Protecting and connecting the Flathead National Forest

A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) calls for completing the legacy of Wilderness lands on the Flathead National Forest in Montana. The report identifies important, secure habitats and landscape connections for five species—bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, grizzly bears, wolverines, and mountain goats. These iconic species are vulnerable to loss of secure habitat from industrial land uses and/or climate change.

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Icebergs strip away rich Antarctic habitat

A once-rich habitat in the Antarctic has become an impoverished zone as icebergs, increasingly breaking free from the surrounding sea ice because of global warming, scour the shallow-water rocks and boulders on which a diversity of creatures cling to life.

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Regional weather extremes linked to atmospheric variations

Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown.

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BPA exposure during fetal development raises risk of precancerous prostate lesions

A new study has found for the first time that the endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the developing prostate, making the gland more susceptible to precancerous lesions and other diseases later in a man's life. The results will be reported Sunday at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago.

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USDA Provides $8 Million to Help Boost Declining Honey Bee Population

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), today announced $8 million in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) incentives for Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin farmers and ranchers who establish new habitats for declining honey bee populations. More than half of the commercially managed honey bees are in these five states during the summer. Today's announcement comes in addition to $3 million USDA designated to the Midwest states to support bee populations earlier this year through the Natural Resources Conservation Service Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

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Far North At Risk Unless Ontario Adopts New, Inclusive Planning Process: Report

With the Ontario government poised to spend $1 billion to promote development in the Ring of Fire, a new paper from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Canada and Ecojustice identifies risks inherent in the current planning legislation and provides a solution.

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American Bird Conservancy Sues Feds Over 30-Year Eagle Kill Rule

Today, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) filed suit in federal court against the Department of the Interior (DOI), charging DOI with multiple violations of federal law in connection with its December 9, 2013, final regulation that allows wind energy companies and others to obtain 30-year permits to kill eagles without prosecution by the federal government.

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Where Has All the Soil Gone?

You may hear the phrase: "We are losing our soil." Sounds serious…but how do we lose soil? Nick Comerford, a member of the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) and professor at the University of Florida, provides the answer.

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Nanoparticles from dietary supplement drinks likely to reach environment, say scientists

Nanoparticles are becoming ubiquitous in food packaging, personal care products and are even being added to food directly. But the health and environmental effects of these tiny additives have remained largely unknown. A new study now suggests that nanomaterials in food and drinks could interfere with digestive cells and lead to the release of the potentially harmful substances to the environment. The report on dietary supplement drinks containing nanoparticles was published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

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Over 800 species added to IUCN threatened list, including 44 lemurs

Experts have added 817 species to the threatened categories of the IUCN Red List in the latest update. Those added include 51 mammals—mostly lemurs—and over 400 plants. The new update finds that over 90 percent of lemurs and 79 percent of temperate slipper orchids are threatened with extinction.

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