YubaNet.com
Saturday, April 18 2015

            We Deliver News to the Sierra
News Fire News spacer Latest News spacer Regional News spacer California News spacer USA News spacer World News spacer Op-Ed spacer Enviro News spacer Sci Tech News spacer Life spacer Odd News spacer Cartoons spacer
Features The Calendar features features Weather features Sierra NightSky features features features Road Conditions features Home spacer
Enviro
 

Indonesian Authorities Arrest Online Orangutan Trader

The State Prosecutor of North Sumatra and WCS’s Wildlife Crimes Unit announced the arrest of a suspect for trafficking a living orangutan in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The trafficker allegedly sold wildlife through Facebook and by BlackBerry Messenger. The arrest was made on April 13, 2015.

Read More


Lawsuit Filed to Save Glacier National Park Stonefly From Extinction

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today for failing to protect a rare stonefly found only in Glacier National Park from extinction. The western glacier stonefly is threatened by the rapid melting of the park’s glaciers, the insect’s only habitat. The Center filed a petition to protect the stonefly in 2010, and in 2011 the Service determined that Endangered Species Act protection may be warranted but still hasn’t issued a legally required decision on the petition.

Read More


Asian Air Pollution Affecting World's Weather

Extreme air pollution in Asia is affecting the world’s weather and climate patterns, according to a study by Texas A&M University and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory researchers.

Read More


Study puts a price on help nature provides agriculture

A team of international scientists has shown that assigning a dollar value to the benefits nature provides agriculture improves the bottom line for farmers while protecting the environment. The study confirms that organic farming systems do a better job of capitalizing on nature's services.

Read More


USGS: Coal-Tar-Sealant Runoff Causes Toxicity and DNA Damage

Runoff from pavement with coal-tar-based sealant is toxic to aquatic life, damages DNA, and impairs DNA repair, according to two studies by the U.S. Geological Survey published in the journals Environmental Science and Technology and Science of the Total Environment.

Read More


Logging means ants, worms and other invertebrates lose rainforest dominance

Invertebrates perform essential functions for the smooth running of the ecosystems in tropical forests. For example, creatures such as termites and millipedes help dead leaves decompose and release their nutrients back into the soil, and carnivorous ants and spiders act as predators of herbivorous invertebrates that would otherwise munch through all the foliage.

Read More


Report: 81% of Dollar Store Products Tested Contain Hazardous Chemicals Linked to Learning Disabilities, Cancer & Other Serious Illnesses

HealthyStuff, in collaboration with the Campaign for Healthier Solutions, released a report today about toxic chemicals found in Dollar store products. The report -- A Day Late and a Dollar Short: Discount Retailers are Falling Behind on Safer Chemicals – includes testing results for 164 dollar store products such as toys, jewelry, school supplies and other household items, that found over 81% (133 of 164) contained at least one hazardous chemical above levels of concern.

Read More


Pesticide exposure contributes to heightened risk of heart disease

Pesticide exposure, not obesity alone, can contribute to increased cardiovascular disease risk and inflammation in premenopausal women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Read More


Bacteria inhibit bat-killing fungus, could combat white-nose syndrome

Bacteria found naturally on some bats may prove useful in controlling the deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome, which has devastated bat populations throughout eastern North America and continues to spread across the continent. Scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, isolated bacteria that strongly inhibited the growth of the white-nose syndrome fungus in laboratory tests.

Read More


Lights tuned to birds' eyes may help reduce bird-aircraft collisions

Collisions with birds are one of the most common hazards to aircraft, causing $700 million in damage annually in the U.S. A study published this week in The Condor: Ornithological Applications may have important implications for reducing bird strikes through the customization of aircraft and runway lights to birds' visual systems. Megan Doppler and Esteban Fernández-Juricic of Purdue University and Bradley Blackwell and Travis DeVault of the National Wildlife Research Center's Ohio Field Station conducted experiments involving captive cowbirds and remote-controlled aircraft to test how the birds reacted to a variety of lights.

Read More


American Rivers announces America's Most Endangered Rivers of 2015

American Rivers today announced its annual list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers®, naming the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon the #1 Most Endangered River in the nation. One of our country’s most iconic stretches of river and an irreplaceable national treasure, the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon faces a battery of threats that could forever harm its health and unique experience that belongs to every American.

Read More


Analysis Finds Hormone Disruptor Used in Cosmetics in Nearly 50 Different Foods

A new EWG analysis has found propyl paraben, a preservative linked to hormone disruption and not allowed in food sold in the European Union, in nearly 50 U.S. snack foods, including Sara Lee cinnamon rolls, Weight Watchers cakes, Cafe Valley muffins, and La Banderita corn tortillas.

Read More


Without water to feed its hydroelectric dams, Brazil turning towards solar power

Brazil’s devastating drought could have the unexpected consequence of finally prompting one of the sunniest countries in the world to take solar power seriously.

Read More


Portland Takes Big Step Forward to Protect Pollinators, Birds, Salmon and Children From Dangerous Pesticides

The Portland City Council took a big step forward today in protecting Portland’s wildlife and park users by passing an ordinance to ban the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, and plants treated with neonicotinoid pesticides, on lands owned by the city. The ordinance also encourages retailers within city limits to accurately label plants, seeds and other products that have been treated with neonicotinoid pesticides. Neonicotinoids are persistent and widely used pesticides that are causing well-documented harm to wildlife and in particular bees, birds and butterflies.

Read More


Bad News for Dolphins and Seals, Factory Trawler from Netherlands Arrives in Australia

The Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) today voiced their fears over the impact the large freezer factory trawler the Dirk Dirk (also known as the Geelong Star) will have on Australia’s wildlife and fisheries.

Read More


Fully protected no-take zones necessary to maintain coral reef fish communities in their natural state

As man-made threats to coral reefs mount and interest in conserving reef ecosystems grows, scientists have turned to studying extremely remote and uninhabited reefs in an effort to understand what coral reefs would be like in the absence of humans. A number of islands and atolls in the Pacific Ocean remain virtually untouched by human influence, situated hundreds of kilometers from the nearest human populations.

Read More


Polar bears unlikely to thrive on land-based foods due to sea ice loss

A team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey found that polar bears, increasingly forced on shore due to sea ice loss, may be eating terrestrial foods including berries, birds and eggs, but any nutritional gains are limited to a few individuals and likely cannot compensate for lost opportunities to consume their traditional, lipid-rich prey -- ice seals.

Read More


Oceans need thousands of years to recover from climate change

Ocean ecosystems that experience rapid upheaval because of climate change can take thousands of years to recover, according to an examination of fossilized ocean fauna on the seafloor by the University of California, Davis.

Read More


Citizen scientists map global forests

New maps of global forest cover from the International Institute for Applied System Analysis (IIASA)'s Geo-Wiki team provide a more accurate view of global forests. The maps were published in the journal Remote Sensing of the Environment, and are freely available for exploration and download on the Geo-Wiki Web site.

Read More


Equatorial fish babies in hot water

Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.

Read More


Mild winters not fueling all pine beetle outbreaks in western United States

Warming winters have allowed mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the coldest areas of the western United States, but milder winters can't be blamed for the full extent of recent outbreaks in the region, a Dartmouth College and U.S. Forest Service study finds.

Read More


Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning

A new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change.

Read More


Deadly Japan quake and tsunami spurred global warming, ozone loss

Buildings destroyed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake released thousands of tons of climate-warming and ozone-depleting chemicals into the atmosphere, according to a new study.

Read More


The first herd of wild horses runs free into pasture at former Soviet army military area in Czech Republic

Instead of Soviet army tanks there are wild horses coming from England. That is what it looks like, from today, in the former military area of Milovice in the Czech Republic, which was occupied by one hundred thousand Soviet soldiers and their families for two decades. While the last transport with the Soviet soldiers left Milovice on 19th June 1991, today fourteen wild horses have been released into the former exercise area.

Read More


World's most productive river, food security for millions under threat from 2 dams

Development of two dams on the Lower Mekong River in Laos is proceeding with potentially devastating impacts to the food security and livelihoods of 60 million people. The projects highlight the types of bad decisions and missed opportunities that threaten the world’s freshwater resources.

Read More


Tens of thousands of Burmese pythons causing significant mammal declines in Everglades National Park

Nearly 80 percent of radio-tracked marsh rabbits that died in Everglades National Park in a recent study were eaten by Burmese pythons, according to a new publication by University of Florida and U.S. Geological Survey researchers.

Read More


Hormone-mimickers widespread in Great Lakes region wastewater, waterways and fish

Larry Barber spent ten years testing water and fish in the Great Lakes region. But he wasn’t looking for the pollutants everyone’s heard of.

Mercury … PCBs … these are still problems. But there’s a lesser-known class of contaminants, which have insidious and concerning health impacts on aquatic creatures.

Read More


Earth at risk in new epoch ruled by destructive humans

Nature has been replaced by humans as the driving force behind changes on the planet − and we need to take urgent action if we are to avoid our own destruction.

Read More


Wind power in the US generates enough electricity for more than 11 million homes, but needs government support for further growth

The wind turbines are turning across America, and a major report by the US Department of Energy (DOE) says the wind energy sector now supplies 4.5% of the nation’s electricity.

Read More


Monster fish, indicator of ecosystem health, face extinction crisis

People think of elephants, tigers and sharks as a bellwether for how the environment is doing, but monster fish, two dozen species of large freshwater fish weighing more than 200 pounds, are an alarming indicator of the health of aquatic ecosystems around the world.

Read More

<< prev page    next page >>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

NEWS . Fire News . Latest . Regional . California . USA . World . Op-Ed . Enviro . Sci/Tech . Life . Odd News . Cartoons
FEATURES . The Calendar .Weather . Sierra NightSky. Road Conditions
YubaNet.com . Advertising. About Us . Support YubaNet . Contact Us . Terms of Use . Privacy

YubaNet.com © 1999-2015
Nevada City, California (530) 478-9600